History

Department/Program: History

Students of history learn how to think, write, speak, conduct research, and interpret the world in ways that will benefit them throughout their lives, not only in their careers, but also as citizens.

History graduates go on to careers in a wide variety of fields, including law, business, government, libraries, information management, teaching, insurance, archives, and publishing.

In addition, history can be combined with any other degree program to create a distinctive course of study.

Given the strong humanities emphasis within Nebraska Wesleyan’s history program, typically a degree in history is taken as a Bachelor of Arts. Students who combine history with a degree in the Social or Natural Sciences, however, usually take their degree as a Bachelor of Science.

Modern foreign language study is expected of all history majors. Transfer students must earn in residence a minimum of 12 hours in history, 6 hours of which must be at the upper level (3000-4990).

Courses

A survey of United States history beginning with precontact cultures, examining the varied colonial and native cultures, and tracing the political, economic, social, and cultural development of the United States, and concluding with Reconstruction. No P/F.
This is not a First Year Writing course.

Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Democracy Thread

A survey of United States history beginning with precontact cultures, examining the varied colonial and native cultures, and tracing the political, economic, social, and cultural development of the United States, and concluding with Reconstruction. No P/F.
(Normally offered each fall semester.)

Archway Curriculum: First-Year Curriculum: First-Year Writing
Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Democracy Thread

A survey of United States history beginning with post-Civil War Reconstruction period, tracing economic, social, and cultural development to the present, emphasizing the emergence of a dominantly urban-industrial society, multiple civil rights movements, the expanded role of government, increasing government in the lives of individuals, and the increasing involvement of the United States in the world. No P/F.
This is not a First Year Writing course.

Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Democracy Thread
Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: UC Leadership Thread

A survey of United States history beginning with post-Civil War Reconstruction period, tracing economic, social and cultural development to the present, emphasizing the emergence of a dominantly urban-industrial society, multiple civil rights movements, the expanded role of government in the lives of individuals, and the increasing involvement of the United States in the world. No P/F.
(Normally offered each spring semester.)

Archway Curriculum: First-Year Curriculum: First-Year Writing
Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Democracy Thread

This is a world-history survey designed to introduce students to the sweep of social, political, economic, and cultural changes that took place around the world over the course of the twentieth century. Using primary sources, the course allows students to investigate in-depth themes such as European colonialism, the First and Second World Wars, fascism and its consequences, the transformation of East Asia, the Cold War and its consequences, and new challenges to global stability in the modern era. No P/F.
(Normally offered each spring semester.)

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Diversity Instructive: Global
Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Going Global Thread

This is a world-history survey designed to introduce students to the sweep of social, political, economic, and cultural changes that took place around the world over the course of the twentieth century. Using primary sources, the course allows students to investigate in-depth themes such as European colonialism, the First and Second World Wars, fascism and its consequences, the transformation of East Asia, the Cold War and its consequences, and new challenges to global stability in the modern era. No P/F.
Offered in University College only.

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Diversity Instructive: Global

A topical course designed to investigate relevant subject matter not included in any standard courses. The title and the content will be determined by current mutual interests of students and faculty. This course may be offered to meet a requirement for a major only by approval of the department chair.

After consultation with the department chair, a student may engage in a supervised independent study or library research. Independent Study may not duplicate courses described in the catalog.
Prerequisite(s): Permission of the department chair.

Supervised individual projects for students on topics selected by the student in consultation with the instructor. Special Projects may not duplicate courses described in the catalog.
Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor.

An on-the-job experience oriented toward the student’s major interest. The student is to secure a position in an organization that satisfies the mutual interests of the instructor, the sponsor, and the student. P/F Only.
Prerequisite(s): Permission of the department chair.

An examination of the Latin American experience with different topics at each offering.  Such topics will include: contact period, transnationalism, indigenismo, the colonial era, agrarian movements, social revolutions, neocolonialism, interamerican relations, narcoterrorism and trafficking, for example. This course will be offered on a regular basis, and students could retake the course as the topics shift. No P/F.

A study of Western Civilization from the Ancient World through the era of the Reformation focusing on the history of Western religious beliefs. Through the reading of religious texts, students investigate the varying conceptions of God or the gods as well as the relationship of the divine to the physical universe and humanity. In the process, students will learn basic features of Western religion and how the circumstances of human existence and broader cultural forces have shaped religious belief in the West. No P/F.
(Normally offered each fall semester.)

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Writing Instructive

A chronological survey of Western Civilization from 1500 to the present, focusing on the literary record which exemplifies changing societies; artistic and literary styles; and philosophical, religious, and political patterns. The course will include a reexamination of Biblical texts in the Reformation, the revival and imitation of classical texts in the Renaissance, absolutism and its critics, the revolutionary and Romantic movements, ethnic minorities, colonialism, the crisis of Western thought in the twentieth century, and the impact of totalitarianism.  This also counts as an elective for the Modern Language Studies major. No P/F.
(Normally offered each spring semester.)

'Who are you?' This question confronts everyone at some point in life. How you answer it is culturally determined, based on how you perceive the connection between yourself and the world you inhabit. In this course we will investigate how the understanding of the self has developed in Western culture, beginning with Ancient Near Eastern religious traditions and the philosophical discourse of Ancient Greece, and looking at how this understanding has evolved and changed over time. Particular attention will be focused on the challenge to traditional notions of the self that emerged with the development with modern psychological and sociological models of the self. No P/F.

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Writing Instructive
Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Identity Thread

One of the distinctive features of Western culture involves the interaction of religion and reason as a basis for understanding. From the Ancient World up to modern times, systems of understanding have rooted themselves in both divine revelation and rational inquiry. This course will explore the origins of such perspectives, and trace their development and interaction from antiquity to the present. The course will focus on reading and evaluating texts which exemplify these modes of thinking from mythologies of the Ancient Near East, to Greek and Roman philosophical writings up to modern debates concerning the sufficiency of religion or science as a basis for understanding. This course may be counted toward fulfillment of the Science and Religion thread, and as a Writing Instructive course.

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Writing Instructive
Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Science and Religion Thread

An introduction to the experiences of women in the United States from colonization to the present, with an examination of cultural meanings attached to gender; various social inequalities in access to institutions, activities, and resources; and women's status, well being, and power in American society. The course investigates the lives of women from various social, ethnic, and racial groups, analyzing the ways that they affected one another. The course emphasizes sexuality, reproduction, and maternity, and also covers politics, law, work, education, and other issues in women's lives. This course includes a service learning component.
Cross listed with GEND 2370.

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Diversity Instructive: U.S.
Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Experiential Learning: Exploratory
Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Gender and Sexuality Thread

A broad survey of the major themes and issues in African American history from the early slave trade through emancipation to the present. Major topics include the creation of a diverse African American culture, resistance to the dehumanization of slavery, Civil War and Reconstruction, the Great Migration, the movement from Civil Rights to Black Power and contemporary issues such as reparations for slavery. This course includes a service learning component. No P/F.
(Normally offered each fall semester)

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Diversity Instructive: U.S.
Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Experiential Learning: Exploratory
Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Power Thread

A broad survey of the major themes and issues in African American history from the early slave trade through emancipation to the present. Major topics include the creation of a diverse African American culture, resistance to the dehumanization of slavery, Civil War and Reconstruction, the Great Migration, the movement from Civil Rights to Black Power and contemporary issues such as reparations for slavery. No P/F.
Offered in University College only.

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Diversity Instructive: U.S.
Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: UC Reflected Self Thread

An overview of American Indian history from precontact to the present. It will explore numerous themes including cultural diversity, initial contact with Europeans, the different styles of interactions (Spanish/English/French), accommodation and dispossession, the U.S. treaty process, concentration, wardship, education, land allotment, termination and relocation, and modern American Indian issues. Utilizing assigned readings, discussion, and some short films, this class will eradicate misconceptions about American Indians and therefore help to eliminate the roots of discrimination and prejudice against the original Americans. No P/F.
(Normally offered each spring semester.)

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Writing Instructive
Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Diversity Instructive: U.S.
Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Power Thread

A study of environmental history focusing primarily on the United States and including Canada and Mexico as they involve border environmental conflicts. Emphasis will be placed on environmental philosophy, ethnic minorities, power and politics, regionalism, industrialism, gender, and literature. Course format will be lecture, class discussions based on assigned readings from assigned texts, as well as supplemental sources, reports, videos, and field trips.

Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Humans in the Natural Environment Thread
Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Experiential Learning: Exploratory

This course will investigate the influence of disease on historical development, and look at the issues involved in the historical study of disease in the past. Themes will include the following: early human settlement and disease, disease as an agent of change, the emergence of new diseases and patterns of pandemics, and changes in diseases over time. We will also consider how the historical record might inform our understanding of the threat of emergent diseases today.

Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Human Health and Disease Thread

The course introduces students to basic theoretical approaches to understanding the past. Special emphasis is placed on research methods, resources, and the composition of a research essay. This course is designed for majors and students interested in the theories and techniques used by historians. Course topics change yearly and include subjects such as the study of chattel slavery in the United States through the words and remembrances of enslaved people from 1600 to 1877 and the relationship between collective memories of the past and the development of identity at the national, local, and individual level.
This course will meet with HIST 3800.

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Writing Instructive

This course introduces students to major topics in the history of East Asia. Rather than a century-by-century narrative covering prehistory to the present, the course emphasizes the theme of inter-regional relations. Students learn about traditions such as Confucianism and Buddhism that provided a foundation for the development of centralized, Sinicized states in East Asia, as well as the cultural, economic, and political aspects of the tribute system that structured inter-regional relations throughout the pre-modern period. The second half of the semester picks up the theme of inter-regional relations in the modern period by examining the continuing impact of twentieth-century warfare on the Chinese, the Koreans, and the Japanese. Our sources include a combination of secondary scholarship by leading experts on East Asian history as well as primary historical and literary sources. This also counts as an elective for the Modern Language Studies major.
(Normally offered every other year.)

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Writing Instructive
Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Diversity Instructive: Global
Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Identity Thread

An overview of key themes in early modern and modern Japanese history with an emphasis on the period between the seventeenth and twenty-first centuries. The course concentrates on themes of change and continuity in Japan's political systems, social and economic institutions, and cultural forms. Specific themes include changing notions of samurai identity, the rise of the modern nation-state, imperialism and inter-regional relations, postwar prosperity and Japan's "Lost Decade." Our sources include a combination of secondary scholarship by leading experts on Japanese history as well as primary historical and literary sources. This also counts as an elective for the Modern Language Studies major.

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Diversity Instructive: Global
Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Writing Instructive

In this course we will survey the historical factors that have shaped China's emergence as one of the dominant players on the global stage in the twenty-first century. We begin by exploring the history of the last imperial dynasty. Emphasis is placed on the historical diversity of Chinese society. After learning about the combination of domestic and external challenges that undermined the last dynasty and led to the overthrow of the imperial system, we look at the impact of the world wars, the civil war between the Nationalists and the Communists, and the establishment of the People's Republic. The course concludes with a section on the transition to "market socialism" and the legacy of the 1989 Tiananmen demonstrations. Our sources include a combination of secondary scholarship by leading experts on Chinese history as well as primary historical and literary sources. This also counts as an elective for the Modern Language Studies major.

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Diversity Instructive: Global
Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Writing Instructive

An intermediate-level course designed to treat subject matter not covered in any of the established history courses. The title, content, and credit hours will be determined by current mutual interests of faculty and students.

After consultation with the department chair, a student may engage in a supervised independent study or library research. Independent Study may not duplicate courses described in the catalog.
Prerequisite(s): Permission of the department chair.

Supervised individual projects for students on topics selected by the student in consultation with the instructor. Special Projects may not duplicate courses described in the catalog.
Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor.

An on-the-job experience oriented toward the student’s major interest. The student is to secure a position in an organization that satisfies the mutual interests of the instructor, the sponsor, and the student. P/F Only.
Prerequisite(s): Permission of the department chair.

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Diversity Instructive: Global
Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Speaking Instructive
Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Chaos Thread
Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Power Thread
Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Identity Thread
Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Gender and Sexuality Thread
Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Speaking Instructive
Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Chaos Thread
Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Speaking Instructive
Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Diversity Instructive: Global

Course topics change each year and include subjects such as the study of chattel slavery in the United States and the relationship between memories of the past and the development of identity at the national, local, and individual level.
This course will meet with HIST 2800.

An intermediate-level course designed to treat subject matter not covered in any of the established history courses. The title, content, and credit hours will be determined by current mutual interests of faculty and students.

After consultation with the department chair, a student may engage in a supervised independent study or library research. Independent Study may not duplicate courses described in the catalog.
Prerequisite(s): Permission of the department chair.

Supervised individual projects for students on topics selected by the student in consultation with the instructor. Special Projects may not duplicate courses described in the catalog.
Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor.

An on-the-job experience oriented toward the student’s major interest. The student is to secure a position in an organization that satisfies the mutual interests of the instructor, the sponsor, and the student. P/F Only.
Prerequisite(s): Permission of the department chair.

A study of the “pioneers” of the Americas (e.g., indigenous, Spanish, French, and Russian) who all came to the continent to explore, negotiate the land and relationships with others they encountered. A mix of narrative and primary document history, the class will discover the true story of the settlement of the Americas.

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Writing Instructive
Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Speaking Instructive
Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Diversity Instructive: Global
Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Chaos Thread

This course is a biographical history of the Presidency that explores a number of individuals who have held the office and expanded the power of the executive branch of the United States' government. Presidents under discussion may include George Washington, John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, Andrew Jackson, Abraham Lincoln, Theodore Roosevelt, Franklin Roosevelt, Lyndon Johnson and Ronald Reagan. The course focuses on how historical context shaped each leader and his times, and vice versa. Students will also investigate the role of First Lady and some of the women who held that title.
HIST 4110 meets with HIST 3110. The requirements of the courses are the same EXCEPT that a research paper is required for students in 4110.

A study of the growth of the United States from 1877-1932, emphasizing the emergence of industrialism and big business and their impact on social, political, and intellectual life. The course will also emphasize the transformation of the United States from a rural to an urbanized society and examine social reform, immigration patterns, changing gender roles, developments in education and the economy. The course culminates with an analysis of the Great Depression.
HIST 4120 meets with HIST 3120. The requirements of the courses are the same EXCEPT that a research paper is required for students in 4120.

A study of society, culture and politics from 1932 to the present beginning with the New Deal and how it transformed the American state. The course then covers World War II, the atomic age and the Cold War, domestic issues in the fifties and sixties such as the Civil Rights Movement, the United States' involvement in Vietnam, changing gender roles and contemporary issues.
HIST 4130 meets with HIST 3130. The requirements of the courses are the same EXCEPT that a research paper is required for students in 4130.

An examination of a historical topic through the study of biography, emphasizing historical background, comparison and contrast of leading figures, and an analysis of motivations and character.
HIST 4140 meets with HIST 3140. The requirements of the courses are the same EXCEPT that a research paper is required for students in 4140.

A study of an American Indian history topic based on the interest of those enrolled and could include topics such as conquest period, Indian Wars, Reservation Era, Indian Civil Rights movement (Red Power), or Sovereignty Issues. Offered as 2 or 4 credits depending on the semester.
HIST 4180 meets with HIST 3180. The requirements of the courses are the same EXCEPT that a research paper is required for students in 4180.

Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Power Thread

An examination of the political, social, and intellectual worlds of ancient Greece and Rome. The purpose of the course is to introduce students to the seminal contributions of antiquity to the Western tradition. The course will concentrate on the setting and content of Greek culture from the age of Homer to the rise of the Macedonian Empire, and the development of Rome from city republic to empire.
HIST 4220 meets with HIST 3220. The requirements of the courses are the same EXCEPT that a research paper is required for students in 4220.
Prerequisite(s): HIST 2120 Western Civilization through Religion to 1648.

A survey of European culture and society from the fall of the Roman Empire to the advent of the Renaissance. The course will focus on the creative religious, political, and social movements of this period, and their influence on the development of the West. Among the subjects covered: the Germanic tribes, the Carolingian Empire, the Church in the High Middle Ages, the culture of the High Middle Ages, the growth of centralized monarchy, the Crusades, and the evolution of the social order in the Middle Ages.
HIST 4230 meets with HIST 3230. The requirements of the courses are the same EXCEPT that a research paper is required for students in 4230.
Prerequisite(s): HIST 2120 Western Civilization through Religion to 1648.

This course looks at the regulation of belief by political and ecclesiastical authorities in medieval and Early Modern Europe, and how such regulation defined and criminalized heresy, nurtured political and social conflict, and justified the use of violence in shaping religious belief and practice. During the High and Later Middle Ages, the medieval Catholic Church developed institutions to pursue, try, and convict deviant religious of heresy. This feature of medieval religion shaped the subsequent development of Western Christianity over the next four hundred years. This course considers the reasons for the emergence of this persecuting dimension of Christian religiosity, and its consequences during the era from 1200-1700.  Among the themes focused upon are the Cather movement and its suppression, the development of the Inquisition, the heretical revolts of late thirteenth and fourteenth centuries, as well as the Protestant Reformation and the witch hunts of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.  
HIST 4280 meets with HIST 3280. The requirements of the courses are the same EXCEPT that a research paper is required for students in 4280.
Prerequisite(s): HIST 2120 Western Civilization through Religion to 1648 or HIST 2170 Body, Mind, Spirit: The Understanding of the Self in Western Culture or HIST 2180 Science and Religion in Western Tradition, or by instructor permission.

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Writing Instructive

An examination of Germany in the twentieth century focusing on the rise of Adolph Hitler, the weakness of the Weimar government, the institutions of the Nazi regime, and the events of World War II and the Holocaust. This also counts as an elective for the Modern Language Studies major.
HIST 4350 meets with HIST 3350. The requirements of the courses are the same EXCEPT that a research paper is required for students in 4350.
Prerequisite(s): HIST 1110 World Civilizations: A Survey of the Global Twentieth Century or HIST 2130 Western Civilization Through Literature or permission of the instructor.

Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Identity Thread

A close investigation of the role that myth plays in understanding the history of the TranMississippi West, particularly up to the late 19th century. Students will explore the actual history through primary documents and narrative history.
HIST 4500 meets with HIST 3500. The requirements of the courses are the same EXCEPT that a research paper is required for students in 4500.

This course highlights women's experiences in the American West from precontact to present, and explores topics of myth and stereotypes; women's roles in the home, family and community; and racial, class and ethnic differences in women's experiences.
HIST 4550 is cross listed with GEND 4550 and meets with HIST 3550/GEND 3550. The requirements of the courses are the same EXCEPT that a research paper is required for students in 4550.

Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Gender and Sexuality Thread

This course explores the History of Nebraska topically, covering such issues as American Indians, overland trails, expansionism, town founding, railroads, political development, and the dust bowl era; as well as the environment, gender history, and other topics of interest to students who enroll. This course will have field experiences.
HIST 4650 meets with HIST 3650. The requirements of the courses are the same EXCEPT that a research paper is required for students in 4650.
Prerequisite(s): HIST 1010/HIST 1010FYW Topics in United States History to 1877 or HIST 1020/HIST 1020FYW United States Society and Culture Since 1877.
(Normally offered each spring semester.)

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Speaking Instructive

A study of the causes, course, and outcomes of several 20th century social revolutions in Latin America. The course will use a comparative perspective, paying particular attention to the transformations that accompanied each stage of revolution. This also counts as an elective for the Modern Language Studies major.
HIST 4700 meets with HIST 3700. The requirements of the courses are the same EXCEPT that a research paper is required for students in 4700.

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Writing Instructive
Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Speaking Instructive
Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Diversity Instructive: Global
Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Chaos Thread

This seminar is intended as an introduction to the breadth and depth of the changes that took place in the three countries of East Asia--China, Korea, and Japan--during the nineteenth century, with particular emphasis on linkages across national borders. We read a wide variety of scholarly studies and primary sources in translation as we examine topics including: the legacy of early modern political and cultural forms; encounters with Western imperial powers; the rise of nationalism; rebellions; and the emergence and regional consequences of Japanese imperialism. This also counts as an elective for the Modern Language Studies major.
HIST 4830 meets with HIST 3830. The requirements of the courses are the same EXCEPT that a research paper is required for students in 4830.

In this seminar we read widely in the political, social, and cultural history of the Meiji period (1868-1912) to develop an understanding of the period's powerful shaping influence on the course Japan took in the twentieth century. In addition to secondary scholarship by leading authorities on the Meiji period, we will read works of literature that illuminate the complexities and tensions within Meiji society. This also counts as an elective for the Modern Language Studies major.
HIST 4840 meets with HIST 3840. The requirements of the courses are the same EXCEPT that a research paper is required for students in 4840.

In this course, we will explore the multiple meanings attached to the Tokugawa period (1600-1868) in Japanese history by reading and discussing works written by Tokugawa-era Japanese, as well as accounts by non-Japanese observers and modern scholars of Japanese history and culture. We learn about the political and social arrangements that differentiated early modern Japan from Western countries (then and now), as well as elements of Tokugawa society and culture that make it seem familiar. Examining the vibrant, diverse culture of early modern Japan allows us to reflect on our own assumptions about the rules that govern human relations, the principles that form the foundation of a just government, the meaning of honor and loyalty, and the relationship between the past and the present. This also counts as an elective for the Modern Language Studies major.
HIST 4850 meets with HIST 3850. The requirements of the courses are the same EXCEPT that a research paper is required for students in 4850.

This class is an upper-level seminar on the cultural history of modern Japan focusing on the popular culture of Tokyo. Students will be introduced to literature, art, and theater, as well as popular practices ranging from early-modern pilgrimage to "costume play" (kosupure) among devotees of anime in contemporary Japan. The course aims to situate cultural forms from the late-seventeenth to the twenty-first century in the context of the key social, political, and economic changes that took place in Japan during the same time. This also counts as an elective for the Modern Language Studies major.
HIST 4860 meets with HIST 3860. The requirements of the courses are the same EXCEPT that a research paper is required for students in 4860.

An upper-level course designed to treat subject matter not covered in any of the established history courses. The title, content, and credit hours will be determined by current mutual interest of faculty and students.

After consultation with the department chair, a student may engage in a supervised, independent reading program.
Prerequisite(s): Permission of the department chair.

In this course students doing an internship will meet regularly with the faculty internship coordinator. They will keep a journal of their interning activities, write reflection papers on the learning in which they are engaged, and develop an oral presentation to be delivered at the end of the interning activities. Pass/Fail Only.
Pre or corequisite(s): HIST 4970 History Internship.

This is a course taken as part of the signature work done by students at the end of their degree program: the senior thesis, internship, or student teaching in History. As part of the course, students will connect their previous learning in the Archway Curriculum, both in their liberal arts and History majors, with the signature work with which they are engaged as seniors. As part of the course, they will explore through their Archway Curriculum e-Portfolio (ACeP) their earlier work, connect the skills and ideas of that earlier work to their current signature work, engage in discourse with other students about themes relevant to their work, and prepare for the next stage of their career beyond college.
Pre or corequisite(s): HIST 3650/HIST 4650 Topics in Nebraska History or HIST 4970 History Internship or HIST 4980 Introduction to Senior Thesis and permission of department chair. 

After consultation with the department chair, a student may engage in a supervised independent study or library research. Independent Study may not duplicate courses described in the catalog.
Prerequisite(s): Permission of the department chair.

Supervised individual projects for students on topics selected by the student in consultation with the instructor. Special Projects may not duplicate courses described in the catalog.
Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor.

On-the-job training for advanced history majors in settings such as archives, museums, archeological sites, libraries, or historical societies. The student will arrange for the position in accordance with the guidelines established by the department. Pass/Fail only.
Prerequisite(s): Permission of the department chair.
Corequisite(s): HIST 4920 Reflecting on the Internship or HIST 4940 History Capstone.

(Normally offered every semester.)

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Experiential Learning: Intensive

To be taken during the spring semester of the junior year or the fall semester of the senior year, this seminar is designed to aid students in the development of their senior thesis topics. Each will prepare a research proposal and a plan of study. Pass/Fail only.
Pre or corequisite(s): HIST 4940 History Capstone and permission of department chair.
(Normally offered every semester.)

To be taken during the senior year, the student will utilize this semester to research the topic developed in HIST 4980 Introduction to Senior Thesis and complete the senior thesis.
Prerequisite(s): HIST 4940 History Capstone and HIST 4980 Introduction to Senior Thesis and permission of department chair.
(Normally offered every semester.)