Sociology and Anthropology

Department/Program: Sociology and Anthropology

The Bachelor of Science is advisable for those who wish to signal social science expertise with training in statistics while the Bachelor of Arts designates a blending of the social sciences with courses in the humanities for a more traditional liberal arts education.

Courses

An introduction to human biological evolution, prehistoric cultural development and nature, and linguistics.
(Normally offered alternate years)

This course reviews the origin and development of culture in preliterate human societies. It focuses on the major social institutions of family, economics, political organization, and religion.
(Normally offered each semester.)

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Diversity Instructive: Global
Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: UC Reflected Self Thread

This course reviews the origin and development of culture in preliterate human societies. It focuses on the major social institutions of family, economics, political organization, and religion.
Offered in University College only.

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Diversity Instructive: Global
Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: UC Reflected Self Thread

This course examines Latin American cultures from an anthropological perspective. It covers stratification and its effects on indigenous populations and contemporary cultures, and the effects of culture change on them.
(Normally offered alternate years.)

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Diversity Instructive: Global

This course examines a wide range of Native American cultures. It includes an exploration of cultures before contact by European populations and contemporary issues facing both reservation and urban Native American populations.
(Normally offered each spring semester.)

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Diversity Instructive: U.S.

This course examines selected cultures from Sub-Sahara Africa with careful attention to culture formation before contact with European culture as well as the effects of colonization and the effects of increases in technology.
(Normally offered alternate years.)

This course examines selected Asian cultures from an anthropological perspective, including the effects of stratification and culture change. It provides a general survey of prehistoric cultures as well as some of the issues related to Western expansion in Asia.
(Normally offered alternate years.)

This course is designed to examine Europe as a culture area. Specific emphasis will be on class systems, peasantry, contemporary life, and tradition and change. Although there are clearly differences among European cultures, they also share common roots in the feudal system. It will also study romance language formation and the drive for the development of the contemporary European economic community.
(Normally offered alternate years.)

This course will be an examination of the relationships between population density and the formation of political structures. It will also study contemporary peoples in Africa, India, and the Near East. It will set the stage for a discussion of some of the current political difficulties that traditional peoples face in their interactions with Western cultures from the United States and Europe.
(Normally offered alternate years.)

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Diversity Instructive: Global

This course summarizes anthropological theories on religious systems and ritual systems. It will also examine relationships between religious systems, population density, and environment in pre-industrial societies. Ethnographic studies from pre-industrial Europe, the Near East, Polynesia, and Asia will be included.
(Normally offered alternate years.)

Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Science and Religion Thread
Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Diversity Instructive: Global

A course designed to treat subject matter not covered in other departmental courses or to provide study of subject matter introduced in other courses. The title, content, and credit hours will be determined by current mutual interests of faculty and students.

Supervised individual projects for students on topics selected by the student in consultation with the instructor. Special Projects may not duplicate courses described in the catalog.
Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor.

This course examines the relationships between economic and environmental forces in pre-industrial societies. Many contemporary pre-industrial societies are still struggling with issues centering around Communism and Capitalism. This course will trace some of those issues to their origin and point out potential scenarios for contemporary non-Western societies. African, Latin American, and Polynesian cultures will be the focus of this course.
Prerequisite(s): ANTHR 1150 Cultural Anthropology or permission of the instructor.

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Diversity Instructive: Global

This is a course designed to treat subject matter not covered in other departmental courses or to provide study of subject matter introduced in other courses. The title, content, and credit hours will be determined by current mutual interests of faculty and students.
Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor

This course offers the opportunity of intensive readings in the discipline based on student and instructor topic of interest.
Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor.

This course provides an opportunity for students to learn from direct experience and personal interaction guided by lectures in the field and selected readings. Students will be guided to formulate and carry out specific research and/or establish constructive relationships with the subjects.
Prerequisite(s): SOC 1110 Introduction to Sociology and ANTHR 1150 Cultural Anthropology or approval of the instructor.

This course provides an opportunity for students to learn from direct experience and personal interaction guided by lectures in the field and selected readings. Students will be guided to formulate and carry out specific research and/or establish constructive relationships with the subjects.
Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor.
Cross-listed with SOCWK 3930 Field Studies: Native American Life

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Diversity Instructive: U.S.
Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Experiential Learning: Intensive

Supervised individual projects for students on topics selected by the student in consultation with the instructor. Special Projects may not duplicate courses described in the catalog.
Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor.

ANTHR 4990 Thesis (1-4 hours)

This course requires the completion of an independent anthropological research project in a topic area of interest to the student. The completed project should be conference quality scientific article can be presented to the academic community in such formats as the NWU Student Symposium or a discipline related conference. Students are responsible for all phases of the research process, including topic selection, academic literature review, definition of the population; sample selection; methodology, data collection and analysis and preparation of the final report (thesis). The paper and the presentation should give evidence that the student is capable of critical integration, synthesis, and analysis of ideas as well as having gained professional-level written and oral communication skills, thereby showing mastery of the departmental goals and objectives. No Pass/Fail. Cross listed with SOC 4990 and CRMJS 4990.
Prerequisite(s): Approval of the instructor.
(Normally offered each spring semester.)

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Writing Instructive

A survey course providing an overall view of the criminal justice system, the law, law enforcement, the courts, and corrections.
(Normally offered each fall semester.)

Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Democracy Thread

This course provides an analysis of the structure-function of law enforcement and the dilemma confronting the police in relation with the community.
Prerequisite(s): CRMJS 1010 Introduction to Criminal Justice.
(Normally offered alternate years.)

Survey of criminal law with emphasis on basic legal procedure developed by the courts and legal problems of law enforcement.
Prerequisite(s): CRMJS 1010 Introduction to Criminal Justice.
(Normally offered alternate years.)

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Writing Instructive

Analysis of the history, theory, structure, and function of contemporary penal institutions.
Prerequisite(s): CRMJS 1010 Introduction to Criminal Justice.
(Normally offered alternate years.)

Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Power Thread
Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Writing Instructive

This course examines the unique framework and workings of the juvenile justice system. This system is in the process of on-going profound changes in both legal rights and corrections. We will examine the reasons why juveniles commit crimes and status offenses. The current issues in juvenile justice such as: gangs, growth in "female" criminal involvement, and the hardening of juvenile offenders are also considered.
Prerequisite(s): CRMJS 1010 Introduction to Criminal Justice.
(Normally offered alternate years.)

This course explores the types of probation and parole, the demand for probation and parole, the advantages and disadvantages of probation and parole, the job duties and qualifications necessary for probation and parole officers, and how probation and parole is integrated into the criminal justice system.
Prerequisite(s): CRMJS 1011 Introduction to Criminal Justice.

This explores the fundamental ethics of working within the criminal justice system. The class will explore the ethics of the various fields such as: forensics, police, probation, parole, corrections, defense attorneys, and prosecutors. We will go deeply into the ethical dilemmas faced by a variety of experts in the criminal justice field.
Prerequisite(s): CRMJS 1011 Introduction to Criminal Justice

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Writing Instructive
Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: UC Reflected Self Thread

Gangs and gang culture is a cutting edge course that explores what gang culture is like, how and why youth join gangs, how hard is it to exit gangs, how the gang culture affects youth and youth decision making, the most effective and least effective ways to combat the growth of gangs, and how communities have failed or been effective at halting gangs.
Prerequisite(s): CRMJS 1011 Introduction to Criminal Justice.

White Collar Crime studies the varied and complex nature of white collar crimes and white collar criminals. The course examines the criminological explanations for white collar crime. The students will get the opportunity to talk with individuals who have committed white collar crimes. The course reviews the various kinds of white collar crime and the role of technology in white collar crimes.
Prerequisite(s): CRMJS 1011 Introduction to Criminal Justice.

This course explores the explosion of cyber-crime and the challenges of policing cyber-crime. This course examines the profile of cyber-criminals and studies the criminology of cyber-crime.
Prerequisite(s): CRMJS 1011 Introduction to Criminal Justice.

This course explores the international and national use of terrorism by various deviant groups. The course examines the profile and motivations of terrorists and terrorism. The course looks deeply into the ways law enforcement on the national and international level seeks to combat terrorism. The course examines specific terrorist acts to better understand the governmental body's strategies, and to determine if the governmental body was successful at suppressing future terrorist's acts.
Prerequisite(s): CRMJS 1011 Introduction to Criminal Justice.

This course explores victim risk analysis and threat assessments from the victim's points of view and police's point of view. Victim risk analysis and threat assessment allow police and security officials to develop strategies and tactical plans. We will explore where the police and security officials have been effective and not effective in assessing risk.
Prerequisite(s): CRMJS 1011 Introduction to Criminal Justice.

A topical course designed to investigate any relevant subject matter not included in any of the standard courses. The title and content will be determined by current mutual interests of students and faculty. This course may be offered to meet a requirement for a major only by approval of the department chair.

Supervised individual projects for students on topics selected by the student in consultation with the instructor. Special Projects may not duplicate courses described in the catalog.
Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor.

This course is a field placement at an agency/organization that is related to the student’s area of career interest and which serves the needs of the organization where the student seeks placement.
Prerequisite(s): Approval of the instructor.

This course offers an examination of contemporary problems in crime and delinquency with emphasis upon the theories of deviant behavior and correction.
Prerequisite(s): CRMJS 1010 Introduction to Criminal Justice and SOC 1110 Introduction to Sociology.
(Normally offered each spring semester.)

Students teach Criminal Justice courses to inmates at the State Penitentiary. The students will apply and expand their understanding of Criminal Justice by teaching inmates criminal justice concepts. The topics covered in a given semester vary but can include material typically found in courses like: Introduction to Criminal Justice, Crime and Delinquency, and Criminal Law. Under the guidance of the course instructor, students prepare and deliver lessons directly to inmates in their capacity as non-matriculated adult learners. In preparation of their time in the prison setting, students organize the curriculum, research the concepts, and prepare a lesson plan for teaching the concepts. Students then present the concepts, assess how that teaching process went for them and for the inmates, and finally, test the inmates on the level of learning of those concepts. May be repeated for credit.
Prerequisite(s): CRMJS 1010 Introduction to Criminal Justice and permission of the instructor.

A course designed to treat subject matter not covered in other departmental courses to provide study of subject matter introduced in other courses. The title, content, and credit hours will be determined by current mutual interests of faculty and students.

This course offers the opportunity of intensive readings in the discipline based on student and instructor topic of interest.
Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor.

Supervised individual projects for students on topics selected by the student in consultation with the instructor. Special Projects may not duplicate courses described in the catalog.
Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor.

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Experiential Learning: Intensive
CRMJS 4990 Thesis (1-4 hours)
Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Writing Instructive

This course is an introduction to using the sociological perspective as a method of social inquiry. Students explore such basic concepts as culture, socialization, social structure, social interaction, and social change. They study and apply the theories and research methodologies used to investigate human social interaction. These concepts are applied to social topics such as race, class, gender, family, crime, population, environment, and others.
(Normally offered each semester.)

Archway Curriculum: Foundational Literacies: Scientific Investigations: Social Science
Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: UC Reflected Self Thread

This introductory course presents the basic processes of human interaction in everyday life while introducing students to the theories and methods governing social inquiry. The sociological perspective is used to study the impact of the forces of culture, socialization, social stratification, race, gender, and population on human thoughts and actions.
Offered in University College only.

Archway Curriculum: Foundational Literacies: Scientific Investigations: Social Science
Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Discourse Instructive
Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: UC Reflected Self Thread

By studying the interconnections between social structure, social forces, and societal problems, students learn to apply the sociological perspective to analyze and understand selected social problems in the United States. A primary objective is to show that the social forces which produce institutional arrangements and social problems operate to shape students' own views of those arrangements and problems. Strong emphasis is placed on the relationship between culture and social inequality and the various social problems under study.
Offered in University College only.

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Diversity Instructive: U.S.

An analysis of the characteristics and problems of racial and minority groups with special emphasis on the themes of prejudice and discrimination. This course focuses primarily on race relations and minority experiences in the United States.
Offered in University College only.

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Diversity Instructive: U.S.
Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: UC Reflected Self Thread
Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Discourse Instructive
Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Gender and Sexuality Thread

An analysis of various interrelationships of man and woman with emphasis on love, courtship, marriage, and family. Institutional, social, and legal perspectives are presented in a cross-cultural and historical frame of reference to elucidate the dynamic relationship between the family, its members, and broader U.S. society.
Offered in University College only.

Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: UC Reflected Self Thread

This course uses sociological perspectives to emphasize the interconnection between individuals, social structure, social forces, and social problems. Students enlist a sociological focus to study and assess what constitutes a "social problem," what causes a social problem, and how selected social problems are addressed. The requirements of the 2120 course are the same as the 1120 course EXCEPT that students in the higher course number complete a 20 hour service-learning component which fulfills an experimental learning requirement of the Archway Curriculum.
(Normally offered once a year.)

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Experiential Learning: Exploratory

This course uses sociological perspectives to examine the causes and consequences of a society stratified by racial-ethinic diversity. It looks at the way historical decisions made by the dominant group have impacted the current situation for majority-minority relations in the U.S.A structural assessment of current social relations is emphasized although individual prejudice and discrimination is examined. Concepts such as white-privilege, immigration, and institutional discrimination are investigated. The requirements of the 2330 course are the same as the 1330 course EXCEPT that students in the higher course number complete a 20 hour service-learning component which fulfills an experimental learning requirement of the Archway Curriculum.
(Normally offered each semester.)

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Diversity Instructive: U.S.
Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Experiential Learning: Exploratory

This course explores the history and contemporary issues of Latinos in U.S. society. It covers the contributions and experiences of the diverse racial/ethnic/cultural groups from Central and South America, Mexico, and the Caribbean who have become part of the society both as immigrants and as conquered peoples. Topics related to Latino experiences in the U.S. include: identity, language, immigration, population growth, political involvement, education, health, integration, and economics.
(Normally offered each fall semester.)

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Diversity Instructive: U.S.

This course offers an analysis of various interrelationships of men and women with emphasis on love, courtship, marriage, and family. Institutional, social, and policy perspectives are presented in a cross-cultural and historical frame of reference to clarify the dynamic relationship between the family, its members, and broader U.S. society. The requirements of the 2350 course are the same as the 1350 course EXCEPT that students in the higher course number complete a field interview project that involves significant writing and which fulfills the writing instructive designation of Archway.
(Normally offered each semester.)

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Writing Instructive
Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Discourse Instructive
Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Gender and Sexuality Thread
Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Gender and Sexuality Thread
Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Gender and Sexuality Thread

This course examines the demographic and social dynamics of population size, composition, and distribution. It addresses the relationships among population, human health, development and the environment. Strong cross-cultural emphasis. A major focus is the development of a semester research paper contrasting the status of the Millennium and Sustainable Development Goals, environmental status, and health in a more- and less- developed country.

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Diversity Instructive: Global
Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Humans in the Natural Environment Thread
Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Writing Instructive
Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Diversity Instructive: Global
Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Chaos Thread
Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Experiential Learning: Intensive

A course designed to treat subject matter not covered in other departmental courses or to provide study of subject matter introduced in other courses. The title, content, and credit hours will be determined by current mutual interests of faculty and students.

In this course students are introduced to descriptive and inferential statistics and their applications to sociological research. Statistical procedures include central tendency measures, variability, t-test, one-way ANOVA, correlation, regression, and chi square. The course also includes specific training in using SPSS for analysis.
Prerequisite(s): SOC 1110 Introduction to Sociology.
(Normally offered each spring semester.)

Supervised individual projects for students on topics selected by the student in consultation with the instructor. Special Projects may not duplicate courses described in the catalog.
Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor.

This course uses the sociological perspective to consider how deviance, crime, and punishment are defined by their social location in time and place rather than being "absolute" categories. It emphasizes that society's ideas about these topics change across generations and across cultures. We will consider how socially constructed demographic categories such as race, social class, and gender are experienced differently in relation to society and the criminal justice system within that society. The focus will be on the balance between structured inequality and personal experiences in a complicated post-industrial society such as ours.
Prerequisite(s): CRMJS 1011/CRMJS 1010 Introduction to Criminal Justice and SOC 1111/SOC 1110 Introduction to Sociology.

Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: UC Leadership Thread

This course uses the sociological perspective to explore sex and gender relations as major features of social life. It considers the social construction of gender (including the creation of masculinities and femininities) and examines the impact of gender ideologies on the social positions of women and men. In particular, it emphasizes the way these social positions (such as gender, race, social class, sexualities, etc.) create and perpetuate the inequalities embedded in its social institutions (like the family, economy/work, religion, media, etc.) This course is cross listed with GEND 3360 and meets with SOC 2360/GEND 2360. The requirements of the 3360 course are the same as the 2360 course EXCEPT that students in the higher course number complete an additional project as determined by the instructor.
(Normally offered alternate years.)

Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Gender and Sexuality Thread

This course uses a sociological perspective to explore gendered issues that women face as perpetrators, victims, and workers in the criminal justice system. As such, students will explore theories and empirical studies related to offending, victimization, and employment. This course is cross listed with GEND 3380 and meets with SOC 2380/GEND 2380. The requirements of the 3380 course will be the same as the 2380 course EXCEPT that students in the higher course number conduct an additional major project as determined by the instructor.

Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Gender and Sexuality Thread

Since all social interaction takes place in groups, this course introduces students to the basic principles of small group structure and interaction. Students participate in group activities throughout the semester in order to study and reflect on the way groups function and influence individual behavior and identity. Topics such as goals, cohesiveness, communication, conflict, and leadership are investigated.
Prerequisite(s): SOC 1110 Introduction to Sociology.
(Normally offered every other year.)

Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Identity Thread
Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Discourse Instructive
Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Humans in the Natural Environment Thread
Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Power Thread

An upper-level course designed to treat subject matter not covered in other departmental courses or to provide study of subject matter introduced in other courses. The title, content, and credit hours will be determined by current mutual interest of faculty and students.

This course offers the opportunity of intensive readings in the discipline based on student and instructor topic of interest.
Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor.

This course explores a broad overview of big ideas about humans, society, change, stability, and chaos that have influenced sociology and other social sciences in the 19th to early 21st centuries. Broad perspectives examined include: Marxism, Functionalism, Weberian rationalization, Symbolic Interactionism, Feminisms, Queer Theory, Critical Theory, Critical Race Theory, Rational Choice, Postmodernism and Poststructuralism, and theories of globalization. This course builds critical thinking, analysis, application, and writing skills essential to majors, minors, and students interested in critically examining society.
Prerequisite(s): SOC 1110 Introduction to Sociology.
(Normally offered each fall semester.)

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Writing Instructive
Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Chaos Thread

In this course, students are introduced to quantitative research methods commonly used in social science research: survey research, experimental design, secondary analysis, and evaluation research.  Emphasis is on survey research, including project design, questionnaire construction, sampling, data collection, statistical analysis, and formal presentation of results.  Key elements of the course are learning to ask researchable questions and formulate testable hypotheses.
Prerequisite(s): SOC 1110 Introduction to Sociology and any Statistics course (SOC 2910 Social Statistics is preferred.)
(Normally offered each fall semester.)

In this course, students are introduced to qualitative research methods commonly used in social science research.  Emphasis is on individualized project design, project construction, data analysis, and formal presentation of results.  Course content includes exploration of observation, participant observation, ethnography, in-depth interviewing, focus groups, content analysis, case study, and online qualitative innovations in research.
Prerequisite(s): SOC 1110 Introduction to Sociology.
(Normally offered each spring semester.)

This course focuses on social privilege and its impact on the meaning and significance of race and ethnicity. It features experiential learning and strong student involvement focused on emerging community issues. Responsibility for classroom activity will be shared by students and instructor. Potential topics covered include such things as minority group-specific studies, white privilege, racism, and intersectional analysis of social identities. This course also serves as a capstone for the American Minority Studies Minor. The requirements of the 4330 course will be are the same as the 3330 course EXCEPT that students in the higher course number will complete an additional major writing project.
Prerequisite(s): SOC 1110 Introduction to Sociology and SOC 1330/SOC 2330 Race Relations and Minority Groups, or approval of the instructor.
(Normally offered alternate years.)

This course explores social stratification, the socially created pattern of unequal distribution of social resources that leads to social inequality. It gives particular attention to social class, but also considers how class intersects with other social categories (such as race/ethnicity and gender) to create even further inequality. It also examines the interconnectedness of social inequality and the primary social institutions of U.S. society. It also explores global social inequality. The requirements of the 4370 course will be the same as the 3370 course EXCEPT that students in the higher course number will select additional in-depth readings, writings, and activities that expand on the course materials.
Prerequisite(s): SOC 1110 Introduction to Sociology.
(Normally offered alternate years.)

This course identifies and explores issues involved in the interacation between humans and the environment. Students are introduced to social impact assessment as a means for identifying the ways resource exploitation leads to both the development and decline of communities. Food production is used to illustrate these impacts because it plays a significant role in community organization, human survival, and environmental resilience. Students enrolled in 4530 complete a semester length experiential field project relevant to the course material.
Prerequisite(s): SOC 1110 Introduction to Sociology or SOC 2530 Population and Environment.
(Normally offered alternate years.)

Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Humans in the Natural Environment Thread

This course examines urban communities and their historical roots. Topics covered include demographic and ecological trends, cross-cultural variations, and current theories about urban processes and community in order to foster an understanding of this dominant form of human social organization. Students engage in field study in areas such as community development, urban administration, spatial organization, and contemporary social problems. The requirements of the 4540 course are the same as the 3540 course EXCEPT that students in the higher course number complete a semester-length field project relevant to the course material.
Prerequisite(s): SOC 1110 Introduction to Sociology.
(Normally offered alternate years.)

Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Power Thread
Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Experiential Learning: Intensive

Supervised individual projects in conjunction with departmental research and student interest. Special Projects may not duplicate courses described in the catalog.
Prerequisite(s): Approval of the instructor.

This course is a field placement at an agency/organization that is related to the student's area of career interest. Substantial field contact hours and regular meetings with instructor are required. The course may be repeated for a maximum of 8 credit hours. No Pass/Fail. Cross listed with CRMJS 4970.
Prerequisite(s): Approval of the instructor.
(Normally offered every year.)

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Experiential Learning: Intensive
SOC 4990 Thesis (1-4 hours)

This course requires the completion of an independent sociological research project in a topic area of interest to the student. The completed project should be conference quality scientific article can be presented to the academic community in such formats as the NWU Student Symposium or a discipline related conference. Students are responsible for all phases of the research process, including topic selection, academic literature review, definition of the population; sample selection; methodology, data collection and analysis and preparation of the final report (thesis). The paper and the presentation should give evidence that the student is capable of critical integration, synthesis, and analysis of ideas as well as having gained professional-level written and oral communication skills, thereby showing mastery of the departmental goals and objectives. No Pass/Fail. Cross-listed with ANTHR 4990 and CRMJS 4990.
Prerequisite(s): Approval of the instructor.
(Normally offered each spring semester.)

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Writing Instructive