Art

Department/Program: Art

Majors, Minors & Degrees:

Art majors pursue either the Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees. A Bachelor of Science degree may be advisable in the case of a double major. The Bachelor of Arts with a major in art is, as in other academic disciplines, designed as a broad-based liberal arts education. The B.A. in art requires an exposure to both two-dimensional and three-dimensional media as well as art history. It can lead to graduate study in art, art history, art therapy, or other academic or professional areas. The B.A. is recommended for those students who wish to pursue K-12 teaching certification. Students who wish to meet Nebraska certification regulations for the teaching of art in secondary schools must include ART 2000 Art in the Secondary School, as one of their art electives. Students should consult the Department of Education regarding additional Nebraska certification requirements.

The Bachelor of Fine Arts in art is traditionally pursued by those students who plan to become either professional artists or artist/teachers. The B.F.A. stresses intensive and specialized studio practice in the creative art disciplines, and is considered the appropriate preparation for study toward the Master of Fine Arts degree. The B.F.A. is considered a professional design degree and is the preferred credential for entry-level positions in design or advertising agencies or studios, as well as for preparation toward entrance to a Master of Fine Arts program.

Each year, art majors are required to present a portfolio representative of the past year’s work to the art faculty. As well, all candidates for degrees with a major in art are required to participate in a senior exhibition as part of ART 3980 Junior Project and ART 4980 Senior Comprehensive.

All entering and first-year students who are majoring in art are considered candidates for the Bachelor of Arts degree. Those students who wish to pursue the Bachelor of Fine Arts degree must be admitted to the program based on the B.F.A. Clearance. In order to qualify for the B.F.A. Clearance, students must have completed or be currently enrolled in the required art core courses (ART 1050 Basic Design, ART 1300 Drawing 1, and ART 2300 Drawing 2: Figure Drawing) as well as one introductory art history course, and introductory (1000-level) courses in both 2-D and 3-D media. The applicant must have a minimum GPA of 3.00 in all art classes completed within the Art Department at the time of the review. The B.F.A. Clearance will be held concurrently with the annual portfolio review that is required for art majors. The art department faculty will evaluate the portfolio and inform the student of its decision in a timely fashion to allow for time to plan schedules.

Courses

A survey of art and architectural hstory using a great masterpieces approach. Significant monuments from antiquity to the twentieth century will be considered with particular attention to the interaction of art and its producing society so that political situation, theology, science, and aesthetics will be considered in lectures. Cannot be used toward a major in art. Credit cannot be earned for ARH 1000 Masterpieces of World Art and ARH 1010 Art and Society in the West: Ancient to Medieval or ARH 1000 Masterpieces of World Art and ARH 1020 Art and Society in the West: Renaissance to Modern.

A survey of art and architectural history in the western hemisphere: significant monuments from prehistory to the medieval period will be considered with particular attention to the interaction of art and its producing society so that political situation, theology, science, and aesthetics will be considered in lectures. Credit cannot be earned for both ARH 1000 Masterpieces of World Art and ARH 1010 Art and Society in the West: Ancient to Medieval.

A survey of art and architectural history in the western hemisphere: significant monuments from the Renaissance to the twentieth contury will be considered with particular attention to the interaction of art and its producing society so that political situation, theology, science, and aesthetics will be considered in lectures. Credit cannot be earned for both ARH 1000 Masterpieces of World Art and ARH 1020 Art and Society in the West: Renaissance to Modern.

A survey of African, Asian, Native American, and Pre-Columbian arts.

An exploration of art and architecture as they developed in antiquity (prehistory to c.300 AD), this course will examine developments in Egypt, Mesopotamia, Greece, and Rome. Prehistoric art in western Europe will be considered as well. Emphasis will be given to the great monuments of each culture and the primary focus will be the interaction between art and its surrounding society. In so doing, politics, religion, science, and aesthetics will be included in classroom discussions.
Prerequisite(s): ARH 1000 Masterpieces of World Art or ARH 1010 Art and Society in the West: Ancient to Medieval or permission of the instuctor.

An examination of the visual arts as they developed in western Europe, particularly Italy, from 1300 to 1600. Painting, sculpture, and architecture will be considered with special emphasis given to the great masters of the period: Botticelli, da Vinci, and Michelangelo among others. The primary focus of the course will be the interaction between art and its surrounding society. In so doing, politics, religion, science, and aesthetics will be included in classroom discussions.
Prerequisite(s): ARH 1000 Masterpieces of World Art or ARH 1020 Art and Society in the West: Renaissance to Modern or permission of the instructor.

Art and architecture primarily in western Europe from 1600 to about 1780 will be considered with primary concentration on the great masters of the era: Caravaggio, Bernini, Rubens, and Rembrandt. Cultural dynamics as they are reflected and affected by the visual arts will be discussed.
Prerequisite(s): ARH 1000 Masterpieces of World Art or ARH 1020 Art and Society in the West: Renaissance to Modern or permission of the instructor.

Art and architecture in western Europe, primarily France, will be considered with particular attention given to the rise of modernism. Major movements and their primary practioners will be considered: Neoclassicism, Romanticism, Realism, Impressionism, and Post-Impressionism.
Prerequisite(s): ARH 1000 Masterpieces of World Art or ARH 1020 Art and Society in the West: Renaissance to Modern or permission of the instructor.

International movements in art and architecture since 1900 will be considered with attention given to the emergence of personal expression in the visual media. Universally recognized masters will be emphasized: Matisse, Picasso, Duchamp, Pollack, and Warhol to name a few.
Prerequisite(s): ARH 1000 Masterpieces of World Art or ARH 1020 Art and Society in the West: Renaissance to Modern or permission of the instructor.

Arranged course involving travel and on-site investigation of art and architecture.
Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor.

A topical course designed to investigate relevant subject matter not included in any standard courses. The title and the content will be determined by current mutual interests of students and faculty. This course may be offered to meet a requirement for a major only by approval of the department chair.

This is a research course. The student initially meets with the department chair to select a study topic and review research methods. At this time the student will be assigned a faculty resource person to guide his or her work and assist in an advisory capacity. A copy of the student's work is filed in the archives for the department. Independent study may not duplicate courses described in the catalog.
Prerequisite(s): Senior standing or permission of the department chair.

Study of age- and developmentally-appropriate philosophy, methodology, processes, and content for visual arts instruction in the elementary schools. Includes strategies for teaching art criticism, art history, art media and techniques, aesthetics, and developing curriculum for the elementary school art program. Students will engage in constructing and solving a series of design problems via a range of 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional art processes. Laboratory and teaching experiences in elementary schools as well as assigned readings, reflective writings, lecture/presentations, hands-on activities, and classroom discussions are provided. Required for certification of elementary teachers and K-12 art endorsements. Cannot be applied toward a major in art.
Cross-listed with EDUC 1000 Art in the Elementary School

This course gives students a working comprehension of the elements and principles of design in a variety of media.  Students are expected to develop a strong studio work ethic, increase creative problem-solving capabilities, and discover ways to communicate ideas visually.  Students learn through making, self-reflection, and critique to develop a verbal/visual vocabulary that forms the foundation for the future study of art.

A studio art investigation of basic design and color theory, composition, and use of light as it relates to painting. Experimentation with the technical processes of painting such as underpainting, scumbling, blending paint, glazing, and varnishing.

An introductory studio art class focusing on the creative, expressive potential of digital media with an emphasis on building a formal foundation utilizing image processing software, HTML and CSS. Projects begin by critically engaging with local visual culture. Discussions will be held on current issues surrounding digital media and field trips to local design hubs will supplement the classroom activities. Students will improve their visual literacy while becoming proficient in using a variety of tools, processes and design elements to create work with real-world applications. Students will participate directly in the campus and wider community by collaborating with university and local organizations to develop these projects that will be utilized in the community.

An introduction to drawing by surveying its use as a foundation for future study in all 2D and 3D media.

Introduction to the techniques of printmaking; relief print, serigraph, intaglio, and lithography. Emphasis on the study of the print as a multiple original with introductory edition printing. Focus on basic design concepts with introductory historical investigation related to printmaking.

An introduction to the basic tools and techniques of digital photography. Focus on the technical craft of using the camera, creating digital prints, and interpreting photographs. Discussion and development of student vocabulary related to subject matter, form, and content of the photographic image in the context of historical and contemporary photographic concerns. Emphasis on student development of a creative problem-solving process related to photographic image-making. This is not a course in professional commercial photography, rather is situated within a fine-art photographic dialogue.

An introduction to the basic tools and techniques of darkroom photography. Focus on the technical craft of using the camera, creating silver gelatin prints, and interpreting photographs. Discussion and development of student vocabulary related to subject matter, form, and content of the photographic image in the context of historical and contemporary photographic concerns. Engagement with local and regional photographic community. Emphasis on student development of a creative problem-solving process related to photographic image-making. This is not a course in professional commercial photography, rather is situated within a fine-art photographic dialogue.

Students will develop a basic foundation and understanding of clay – its nature, attributes, possibilities, and limitations – through basic handbuilding and throwning techniques.  Focus on appreciation for clay as a medium for personal and artistic expression. Additionally, the study and understanding of historical and contemporary works in clay will help each student better understand the material and its place in history.
This course may not be taken as "Pass/Fail".

This course is an introduction to the basic language of sculpture, spatial concepts and technical processes as they relate to sculptural practices.  Students will investigate three-dimensional design principles, sculptural strategies, and themes employed throughout history and contemporary object making.  A broad range of processes and versatile materials are explored including tools and equipment used in metal and wood fabrication, plaster mold making, and additive and subtractive construction methods.  In addition, students will gain knowledge and observe professional standards of shop conduct and safety.

Introduction to the basic tools and techniques of metalsmithing for use in body ornament or as small sculptural form. Broad studio art exploration in the techniques of sheet metal construction including cutting, piercing, soldering, mechanical joining, surface embellishment, and finishing. Emphasis on historical metalsmithing in relationship to contemporary attitudes in metalsmithing.

A topical course designed to investigate any relevant subject matter not included in any of the standard beginning-level courses. The title, content, and credit will be determined by the faculty member who is offering the course. This course may be offered to meet a requirement for a major only by approval of the department chair.

A survey of teaching visual arts education in the secondary schools (grades 7-12). Emphasis on administration, organization, curriculum, and philosophy of art in education. Required for K-12 art certification. Cannot be applied toward a major in art. Cannot be applied toward a major or minor in art.
Prerequisite(s): 15 hours of art and acceptance into the Teacher Education Program or permission of the chair of Department of Education.

A continuation of studio art investigation of color theory and use of light with added emphasis on the relationship between composition and content informed by historical painting concepts. Experimentation with the technical processes of direct and indirect painting.
Prerequisite(s): ART 1100 Painting 1

This course builds appreciation for time-based media in a fine art context. Students develop skills in video production and editing. They develop creative problem solving skills, including various methods of ideation and visual communication for self-expression. Engagement with the surrounding community is an essential part of the course that connects student learning to the wider world.
Prerequisite(s): ART 1200 Digital Media 1

A class focused on the human figure and portrait. Basic anatomy, movement, and composition will be covered by having each class session with a model. This class will benefit students who are interested in all artistic media by giving them an understanding of the human form.
Prerequisite(s): ART 1300 Drawing 1

An examination of one print form (relief, serigraphy, intalgio, lithography, or digital printmaking) focused on the study of composition and content as it relates to the technical and formal considerations of that particular medium. Emphasis on the use of color and color theory. Edition printing.
Prerequisite(s): ART 1400 Printmaking 1

Students build on the technical knowledge and skill gained in Photography 1 to develop and understanding of the relationship between form and content. Students will increase their awareness of contemporary photography and begin to express themselves through photography. They will work on describing and analyzing images verbally and in writing. This is not a course in professional commercial photography, rather is situated within a fine-art photographic dialogue.
Prerequisite(s): ART 1500 Photography 1: Digital or ART 1550 Photography 1: Darkroom.

An introduction to the basic tools and techniques of darkroom photography. Focus on the technical craft of using the camera, creating silver gelatin prints, and interpreting photographs. Discussion and development of student vocabulary related to subject matter, form, and content of the photographic image in the context of historical and contemporary photographic concerns. Engagement with local and regional photographic community. Emphasis on student development of a creative problem-solving process related to photographic image-making. This is not a course in professional commercial photography, rather is situated within a fine-art photographic dialogue.
Prerequisite(s): ART 1500 Photography 1: Digital.

Archway Curriculum: Foundational Literacies: Creative and Performing Arts

Exploration of complex methods of handbuilding and throwing techniques, as well as conceptual problem solving in clay. Basic theoretical study of clays, glazes, kilns, and firing. Emphasis on ceramics in a historical context in relationship to contemporary attitudes in clay.
Prerequisite(s): ART 1600 Ceramics 1

This course builds on skills learned in Sculpture I while introducing advanced techniques using metal and wood fabrication, non-traditional art making materials, and contemporary themes.  Students will continue to investigate spatial strategies, develop artist statements, and continue to further their knowledge of tools, equipment and materials, as well as observe professional standards of shop conduct and safety.
Prerequisite(s): ART 1700 Sculpture 1

Exploration of metalsmithing forming techniques with an emphasis on conceptual problem- solving and personal expression in metalsmithing. Studio exploration in stretching and angle raising of sheet metal, forging, repousse, and chasing. Study of historical and contemporary metalsmithing are used as foundations for design and ideation.
Prerequisite(s): ART 1800 Metalsmithing 1

A topical course designed to investigate any relevant subject matter not included in any of the standard advanced-level courses. The title, content, and credit will be determined by the faculty member who is offering the course. This course may be offered to meet a requirement for a major only by approval of the department chair.

This is a research course. The student initially meets with the department chair to select a study topic and review research methods. At this time the student will be assigned a faculty resource person to guide his or her work and assist in an advisory capacity. A copy of the student's work is filed in the archives for the department. Independent study may not duplicate courses described in the catalog.
 

Supervised, advanced-level projects not included in any of the standard courses. Normally developed for an individual student but may be arranged for a small group of students.
Prerequisite(s): 9 hours of art and permission of the instructor.

An on-the-job supervised training experience with a business or non-profit organization, such as an art gallery, professional art studio, or business utilizing art or design. A minimum of 3 hours of work per week for each hour of credit
Pass/Fail only.
Prerequisite(s): A major in art or permission of the department chair and permission of the sponsoring agency.

In a seminar format, this course will survey different methodological and theoretical approaches to the art criticism and art production of the twentieth century.
Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor.

A survey of the field of art therapy in its various applications and theoretical orientations.
Prerequisite(s): 8 hours of psychology, including PSYCH 1010 Introduction to Psychological Science, and 9 hours of art, or permission of the instructor.

Continued investigation of the relationship between composition and content informed by historical painting concepts. Emphasis on introductory individual student research in form and content through experimentation with tools, additive elements, and surfaces.
Prerequisite(s): ART 2100 Painting 2.

This course builds on the skills introduced in Digital Media 1 and 2 as well as Basic Design. Students will hone their video skills and design sensibility through self-designed projects with the supervision of the professor. Engagement with the surrounding community is an essential part of the course that connects student learning to the wider world.
Prerequisite(s): ART 2200 Digital Media 2.

A class treating drawing as a medium in itself. The student will create individually guided work informed by contemporary theory and art history with the close supervision of the professor. Group critiques will be included in the class.
Prerequisite(s): ART 2300 Drawing 2: Figure Drawing

Examination of one print form (relief, serigraphy, intaglio, lithography, or digital printmaking) with emphasis on the study of composition and content as it relates to the technical and formal considerations of the particular medium. Edition printing. Opportunity for introductory student research and an emphasis on the relationship of media to the form and content.
Prerequisite(s): ART 2400 Printmaking 2

Students use the technical knowledge and skill gained in Photography1 & 2 to express themselves through photographic media. They will increase their ability to describe and analyze images verbally and in writing. At this point they will have a well-rounded knowledge of contemporary photographers, photographic processes and issues. Experimental processes may be explored at this stage.
Prerequisite(s): ART 2500 Photography 2

Focus on the balance of technical competence in both thrown and handbuilt clay forms and engagement with aesthetic concerns. Emphasis on introductory individual student research in form and conceptual problems. Study of clay and glaze chemistry. Emphasis on ceramics in a historical context in relationship to contemporary attitudes in clay.
Prerequisite(s): ART 2600 Ceramics 2

This course builds on technical skills and historic and contemporary themes addressed in Sculpture I and Sculpture II while introducing advanced spatial strategies of three dimensional object –based installation and site specific work.  In addition, students will present thoughtful research on contemporary artists that inform their studio practices, continue to develop artist statements, and observe professional standards of shop conduct and safety. 
Prerequisite(s): ART 2700 Sculpture 2

Students will continue their exploration of form and content by combining experimentation with both technical competence and aesthetic concerns of the medium. Experimentation with advanced techniques will include constructing mechanisms and casting.
Prerequisite(s): ART 2800 Metalsmithing 2

 To be taken during the spring semester of the junior year.  Students will begin to formulate an inclusive portfolio of their work and a thesis for presentation in the Senior Comprehensive. Students will participate in regularly scheduled portfolio critiques and will be required to address relevant questions in a comprehensive written thesis. 
Meets concurrently with the Senior Comprehensive course. 
Prerequisite(s): Junior status and permission of department chair.

Continuation of exploration of historical painting concepts and individual research. Emphasis on student directed content, problems, and solutions within the context of painting techniques that result in a body of work.
Prerequisite(s): ART 3100 Painting 3

Students in this course develop at least one of the technical skills learned in previous Digital Media courses to a professional or internship level. They practice methods of reflection, soul searching and nurturing creativity to develop a sustainable, iterative working process, which will be applied during the course to develop one or more works that will become a component of the thesis exhibition.
Prerequisite(s): ART 3200 Digital Media 3

The student is expected to prepare a cohesive portfolio of drawings for graduate application and exhibition opportunities. A written component will be due with the portfolio. Study of advanced critical theory and group critiques will be included in the class.
Prerequisite(s): ART 3300 Drawing 3

Examination of one student-selected print form (relief, serigraphy, intalgio, lithography, or digital printmaking) with emphasis on the study of composition and content as it relates to the technical and formal considerations of the particular medium. Emphasis on student directed content, problems and solutions within the context of a printmaking medium that results in a body of work.
Prerequisite(s): ART 3400 Printmaking 3

Independently driven projects are the core of this course. Students follow their interests and skills developed in previous semesters of photography to a professional or internship level. They will engage in creative inquiry, research and self-reflection to develop a body of work that is contextualized in the wider art world.
Prerequisite(s): ART 3500 Photography 3

Continued concern with a balance of technical competence in both thrown and handbuilt clay forms and an engagement with aesthetic concerns. Emphasis on student directed content, problems, and solutions within the context of ceramics that result in a body of work. Exploration of current trends and issues in ceramics as related to individual student research.
Prerequisite(s): ART 3600 Ceramics 3

This course builds on technical skills and historic and contemporary themes addressed in all previous Sculpture course while introducing concepts of an interdisciplinary studio practice, blurring the lines between traditional studio disciplines and investigating time-based strategies.  Students will present thoughtful research on contemporary artists that inform their studio practices, continue to develop artist statements, and observe professional standards of shop conduct and safety.
Prerequisite(s): ART 3700 Sculpture 3

Students will continue to explore current trends and issues in metalsmithing in relationship to their individual research concerns.  Emphasis on student directed content, problems, and solutions within the context of metalsmithing that result in a body of work.
Prerequisite(s): ART 3800 Metalsmithing 3

A topical course designed to investigate relevant subject matter not included in any standard courses. The title and the content will be determined by current mutual interests of students and faculty. This course may be offered to meet a requirement for a major only by approval of the department chair.

This is a research course. The student initially meets with the department chair to select a study topic and review research methods. At this time the student will be assigned a faculty resource person to guide his or her work and assist in an advisory capacity. A copy of the student's work is filed in the archives for the department. Independent study may not duplicate courses described in the catalog.
Prerequisite(s): Senior standing or permission of the department chair.

Supervised individual projects for students on topics selected by the student in consultation with the instructor. Special Projects may not duplicate courses described in the catalog.
Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor.

An on-the-job supervised training experience with a business or non-profit organization, such as an art gallery, professional art studio, or business utilizing art or design. A minimum of 3 hours of work per week for each hour of credit
Pass/Fail only.
Prerequisite(s): A major in art or permission of the department chair and permission of the sponsoring agency.

Designed to prepare seniors in art for graduation, this course includes experiences in planning, promoting, and opening a senior gallery exhibition. Students and instructor will work together to prepare professional resumes and portfolios, which include a written artist statement. Includes a gallery talk, presentation to the public, and an exit evaluation by the art department faculty.
Prerequisite(s): ART 3980 Junior Project and art history courses.