Education (Undergraduate)

Department/Program: Education (Undergraduate)

Education students may earn a Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Arts degree. The choice of a B.S. or B.A. may be dependent on the student's area of study or second major. The B.A. for elementary and special education majors requires two years of college-level foreign language. Students majoring in music earn a Bachelor of Music degree.

Nebraska Wesleyan’s education programs are approved by the Nebraska Department of Education and accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education.

National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education
2010 Massachusetts Avenue, NW, Suite 500
Washington, D.C. 20036-1023
202.466.7496
www.ncate.org

Teacher Certification Requirements

Candidates for teacher certification must earn in residence at least 30 hours of credit, 12 hours of which must be in each endorsement program.

All students who expect to be recommended for teacher certification must become candidates in the department’s Teacher Education Program. Once a student has applied for candidacy in the program, the student must schedule coursework with an adviser in the education department and in the student’s teaching subjects or field. After a student fulfills the requirements or a degree for graduation and for the Teacher Education Program, the student may be recommended for a teaching certificate by the certification officer in the Education Department. The Career Center assists prospective teachers in securing teaching contracts but does not guarantee employment.

Teaching Endorsements

Teaching endorsements are divided into two categories: subjects and fields. Candidates must complete at least one subject endorsement or one field endorsement to become certified.

Subject Endorsement

Candidates who are preparing for a subject endorsement should choose from the following list: general art, basic business, biology, chemistry, English, history, instrumental music, physics, theatre, vocal music and world language (French, German, Spanish). See the education department for details.

Field Endorsement

To be certified, a candidate who is preparing for a field endorsement must choose one of the following fields: art; business, marketing and information technology; elementary education; health and physical education; language arts; mathematics; middle grades; music (combination); natural sciences; physical science, social science, and special education-mild/moderate disabilities. See the education department for details.

The department offers supplementary certicates in coaching and English language learning (English as a second language). See the education department for details.

Pass/Fail Policy

Education department courses are not offered on a Pass/Fail basis except for a field experience.

Supervised Teaching

A variety of supervised teaching (commonly called student teaching) opportunities are offered for students in education. These individuals may student teach in the Lincoln Public Schools, neighboring communities, in Chicago’s urban schools, or abroad. A minimum of 14 semester hours of supervised teaching is required for graduation.

Supervised Teaching Abroad

Nebraska Wesleyan’s supervised teaching program allows students to complete eight weeks of their student teaching requirement in Australia, New Zealand, Taiwan, Germany, Spain, England, Ireland, Costa Rica, Scotland, Wales, or India. Students interested in teaching abroad should apply to the department one year in advance. Students should contact the department chair for details.

Supervised Teaching through the Chicago Center for Urban Life and Culture

Student teaching in an urban environment in Chicago may be available as part of the Chicago Center for Urban Life and Culture. Along with student teaching, students attend seminars that introduce them to the city. Students should contact the department chair for details.

Courses

A course providing a broad, general survey of education in the United States, designed to help students decide whether to continue coursework in professional education. This course is a prerequisite to further work in the department.

(Normally offered each semester.)

A course designed to allow students an opportunity to determine if they have a talent for teaching. Students will be assigned to assist a preschool, elementary, or secondary school teacher for a designated period of time each week. May be repeated a maximum of three times.

Pass/Fail only.

Pre or corequisite(s): EDUC 001 Introduction to Education in the United States.

(Normally offered each semester.)

The course is designed to provide students with an exploratory experience in preschool or kindergarten. Students will be assigned to assist teachers for a designated period of time each week. May be repeated a maximum of three times.

Pass/Fail only.

Pre or corequisite(s): EDUC 001 Introduction to Education in the United States.

A course designed to acquaint students with the basic principles of growth and all phases of human development. Students will be required to assist an elementary or secondary teacher for a 50-minute period twice a week.

Pre or corequisite(s): EDUC 001 Introduction to Education in the United States or permission of the instructor.

(Normally offered each semester.)

Students observe/assist in educational settings associated with our P-12 school system.

Corequisite(s): EDUC 105 Human Development and Learning I.

(Normally offered each semester.)

A continuation of EDUC 105 Human Development and Learning I with emphasis on the principles of learning and their application in the field of education. Secondary students will be required to assist a school teacher for a 50-minute period twice a week.

Pre or corequisite(s): EDUC 001 Introduction to Education in the United States and EDUC 105 Human Development and Learning I, or permission of the instructor.

(Normally offered each spring semester.)

Students observe/assist in secondary level school settings. Only students seeking 7-12 certification complete this lab.

Corequisite(s): EDUC 106 Human Development and Learning II.

(Normally offered each spring semester.)

A course designed for those who are concerned with teaching children from birth through age eight. The content will integrate knowledge about child growth and development into the process of preparing a meaningful educational program for young children. A unit on educational assessment and interpretation of results is also included.

This course serves as a theoretical foundation for the Reading and Language Arts Methods course. The students will define reading and discuss the purposeful nature of reading. The class presents a survey of the various theories of reading acquisition and familiarizes students with specific theories. It will encourage students to begin forming their own philosophy about the reading process. The State Standards for Reading and Writing will be presented and explored for their connections to theory and practice. The interconnectedness of listening, speaking, reading, and writing will be explored. This course will begin to build the bridge between theory and classroom application.

(Normally offered each spring semester.)

This course is designed to familiarize students with the learning processes of English language learners, including their understanding of the new culture and its educational system. Students will demonstrate knowledge of basic federal and state laws related to limited English proficient students, as well as demonstrate knowledge of ways to create linkages with students' families that enhance their educational experiences. Practicum experiences will allow students to engage in reflective thinking by analyzing, evaluating, and strengthening their professional practice. The course structure combines lectures, discussions, required readings, practicum experiences, and a practical application of skills.

An introduction to and survey of the genres of literature for children, along with the place of children's literature in the curriculum and the evaluation of the literary worth of children's books. Opportunity to design trade book activities is provided by a lab experience.

(Normally offered each spring semester.)

A survey study of instructional materials of special interest to the junior and senior high school age. Examination of various sources of print and nonprint materials. Includes bibliotherapy, book-talk techniques, notable authors/producers, and prize winning materials. Discussion of censorship, controversial issues, selection criteria, and the tools to keep abreast of the field.

This course, which meets the Nebraska Human Relations Training requirement for teacher certification, focuses on the history, culture, and contributions of African Americans, Native Americans, Asian Americans, and Hispanics. In addition, it seeks to sensitize students to dehumanizing biases experienced by groups due to race, ethnicity, gender, social class, religion, exceptionality, sexual orientation, and language background.

Prerequisite(s): Declaration of education major (Elementary Education, Special Education, Middle Grades Education) or a K-12/7-12 Teacher Education Certification program in the Registrar's Office.

A course designed to treat subject matter not covered in other standard courses or to provide study of subject matter introduced in other courses. The title, content, and credit hours will be determined by current mutual interests of faculty and students.

Prerequisite(s): Approval of the department chair.

An opportunity for a student to engage in an individually arranged project supervised by a member of the faculty.

Prerequisite(s): Approval of the department chair.

A study of a variety of methods as well as curriculum design/implementation for successful teaching of modern languages in the elementary classroom. Materials are evaluated as well as created to enhance learning. French, German, Japanese, and Spanish are included.

Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into the Teacher Education program or permission of the department chair.

A study of teacher-made, informal tests as well as formal, standardized tests. Students learn to devise assessment instruments for evaluation purposes. They also learn to administer, score, and interpret the results of standardized tests.

Prerequisite(s): Acceptance in the Teacher Education Program or permission of the department chair.

(Normally offered each semester.)

A study of a variety of methods as well as curriculum design/implementation for successful teaching of modern languages in the middle and secondary school classroom. Materials are evaluated as well as created to enhance learning. French, German, Japanese, and Spanish are included.

Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into the Teacher Education program or permission of the department chair.

A study of the tools and techniques of measurement and evaluation. The specific topics depend upon the student's program and needs.

Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into the Teacher Education Program or permission of the department chair.

A study of the organization, function, administration, interdisciplinary curriculum, instruction, assessment, pupils, and history of the middle school and junior high school. Students design and teach an interdisciplinary unit plan that incorporates specific teaching assessment strategies as well as integrates forms of instructional technology.

Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into the Teacher Education Program or permission of the department chair.

A survey of the methods for teaching communication in the classroom and of directing extracurricular activities.

Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into the Teacher Education Program or permission of the department chair.

The study and use of teaching methods and models in middle and secondary schools and their application to the learning styles of these age groups. Includes an examination of various science curriculum programs, laboratory safety procedures, and the selection and organization of content and teaching materials.

Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into the Teacher Education Program or permission of the department chair.

The study of the methods of teaching mathematics in middle and secondary schools. Includes teaching materials, methods, objectives, and various models of teaching.

Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into the Teacher Education Program or permission of the department chair.

A critical and functional study of effective methods of instruction with emphasis on the planning/teaching/assessment processes applicable for junior high and high schools. Students design and teach an interdisciplinary unit plan in EDUC 236 General Secondary Methods Lab that incorporates specific forms of instructional technology.

Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into the Teacher Education Program or permission of the department chair.

Corequisite(s): EDUC 236 General Secondary Methods Lab.

(Normally offered each semester.)

Students plan and teach a variety of lessons within a unit plan that incorporates specific teaching and assessment strategies. Second, students will apply various classroom management approaches.

Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into the Teacher Education Program or permission of the department chair.

Corequisite(s): EDUC 235 General Secondary Methods.

(Normally offered each semester.)

A study of effective methods of instruction used in junior and senior high schools.

Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into the Teacher Education Program or permission of the department chair.

A course focusing on the methodology, processes, and content of reading and writing at the secondary school level. Particular attention is given to strategies effective in teaching developmental reading and writing, content area reading and writing, and basic skills in diagnosis and remediation. Laboratory experiences are provided.

Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into the Teacher Education Program or permission of the department chair.

(Normally offered each fall semester.)

This course focuses on the content and process skills of teaching and learning math in the elementary and middle grades. The course incorporates methodologies (including interdisciplinary approaches) for developing and implementing curriculum and assessing learning. Laboratory experiences are provided.

Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into the Teacher Education Program or permission of the department chair.

Corequisite(s): EDUC 244 Teaching Natural Sciences in Elementary and Middle Grades.

(Normally offered each spring semester.)

A course focusing on the methodology, processes, and content of elementary social sciences. It includes strategies for teaching the seven disciplines of the social sciences, interdisciplinary approaches, human relationships, mental health, and community health. Laboratory experiences are provided.

Prerequisite(s): EDUC 109 Reading Theory and acceptance into the Teacher Education Program, or permission of the department chair.

This course focuses on the content and process skills of teaching and learning science in the elementary and middle grades. The course incorporates methodologies (including interdisciplinary approaches) for developing and implementing curricula and assessing learning. Laboratory experiences are provided.

Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into the Teacher Education Program or permission of the department chair.

Corequisite(s): EDUC 240 Teaching Mathematics in Elementary and Middle Grades.

(Normally offered each spring semester.)

A course focusing on planning, teaching, and assessing the four broad areas of literacy: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The course includes writing plans that address objectives and standards, and meeting the needs of individual students. Teaching includes a variety of methodologies: basal series, direct instruction, holistic approaches, and balanced instruction. Effective listening, speaking, and writing through knowledge and proficiency in grammar usage, spelling, and handwriting are covered. Students gather information and experiences throughout the semester to form their own philosophies of teaching and assessing literacy. A unit on educational assessment and interpretation of results is also included. Includes 25 hours of practicum experience.

Prerequisite(s): EDUC 109 Reading Theory and acceptance into the Teacher Education Program, or permission of the department chair.

Corequisite(s): SPED 248 Curriculum Adaptions for Language Art Methods.

This course is designed to familiarize students with effective research-based methods for designing curriculum and assessments for English language learners. Key concepts addressed in this course include language development in the learning domains of reading, writing, listening, and speaking. Students will demonstrate knowledge of basic federal and state laws related to limited English proficient students, as well as demonstrate knowledge of ways to create linkages with students' families that enhance their educational experiences. Practicum experiences will allow students to engage in reflective thinking by analyzing, evaluating, and strengthening their professional practice. The course structure combines lectures, discussions, required readings, and a practical application of skills.

This course is designed to familiarize students with effective research-based methods for instructing English language learners, including scaffolding instruction in mainstream content-area courses. Students will demonstrate knowledge of basic federal and state laws related to limited English proficient students, as well as demonstrate knowledge of ways to create linkages with students' families that enhance their educational experiences. Practicum experiences will allow students to engage in reflective thinking by analyzing, evaluating, and strengthening their professional practice. The course structure combines lectures, discussions, required readings, practicum experiences, and a practical application of skills.

A diagnostic view of all elements pertinent to teaching English in middle and secondary schools. Strong practical emphasis will be placed on the proportional and organized development of middle and secondary English courses, realistic presentation of materials, and the practical and varied methods of testing appropriate to such courses.

Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into the Teacher Education Program or permission of the department chair.

Designed for middle and secondary education students working toward certification in one of the following social science fields: economics, general social studies, history, political science, psychology, and sociology.

Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into the Teacher Education Program or permission of the department chair.

(Normally offered each fall semester.)

Students work with one or more music teachers in an elementary school.

Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into the Teacher Education Program or permission of the department chair.

Students are given the opportunity to teach children in an early childhood program (birth through kindergarten). They teach a full day for ten weeks, attend the student teaching seminar, and conference with their college supervisor as directed.

Prerequisite(s): Completion of preliminary student teaching requirements or approval of the department chair.

Corequisite(s): EDUC 280 Supervised Teaching in the Elementary School or SPED 287 Special Education Practicum.

Students work with one or more regular teachers in an elementary school. They teach a full day, attend the student teaching seminar, and conference with their college supervisors as directed.

Prerequisite(s): Completion of preliminary student teaching requirements or approval of the department chair.

Students work with one or more regular physical education teachers in an elementary school. They attend the student teaching seminar and conference with their college supervisor as directed.

Prerequisite(s): Completion of preliminary student teaching requirements or approval of the department chair.

This course will provide a practical overview of setting objectives, utilizing teaching materials, selecting and organizing subject matter, and instructing and evaluating as applied to accounting and basic business subjects.

Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into the Teacher Education Program or approval of the department chair.

Students work with one or more music teachers in a secondary school.

Prerequisite(s): Completion of preliminary student teaching requirements or approval of the department chair.

Students work with one or more regular teachers in a middle grades classroom. They attend the student teaching seminar and conference with their college supervisor as directed.

Prerequisite(s): Completion of preliminary student teaching requirements or approval of the department chair.

This course focuses on various attitudes, behaviors, and techniques which lead to effective classroom management. Students will engage in critical thinking and reflection as they review and develop effective classroom management practices.

Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into the Teacher Education Program or approval of the department chair.

(Normally offered each fall semester.)

Students work with one or more regular teachers in a secondary school. They attend the student teaching seminar and conference with their college supervisor as directed.

Prerequisite(s): Completion of preliminary student teaching requirements or approval of the department chair.

The Chicago Center for Urban Life and Culture project is a semester-long program that involves both interdisciplinary class work and field experiences in Chicago, Illinois, including full-time student teaching. The semester program will replace certain teacher certification program requirements as determined by the department chair.

Prerequisite(s): Students must meet the preliminary requirements for student teaching, be approved by the education department and the chair of the department in which the student is majoring, and be accepted by the Chicago Center Program Director.

A course designed to treat subject matter not covered in other standard courses, or to provide advanced study of subject matter introduced in other courses. The title, content, and credit hours will be determined by current mutual interests of faculty and students.

Prerequisite(s): Approval of the department chair.

An opportunity for a student to engage in an individually arranged project supervised by a member of the faculty.

Prerequisite(s): Approval of the department chair.

A capstone course that meets biweekly for two hours to focus on two areas: first, to provide a structured and safe environment to dialogue about student teaching successes and concerns; and second, invited speakers, students and the instructor will discuss topics most pertinent to student teaching, how to obtain a teaching position, and critical issues for the beginning teacher. Topics include educational law, morals and ethics, student/teacher/parent rights and responsibilities, establishing and maintaining positive communication with the staff and community, as well as interviewing and job search skills.

Corequisite(s): Student teaching or permission of the department chair.

(Normally offered each semester.)

Intercultural Communication for Educators will introduce students to the cultural differences that influence the exchange of meaning between people of different cultural backgrounds. The study of what culture is, where culture comes from, and how culture manifests itself in every day life will be the heart of this course. A myriad of strategies and skills for successfully communicating across cultures in the classroom (as well as other contexts) will be explored and practiced.

Prerequisite(s): Bachelor's degree.

This course is designed to familiarize students with aspects of curriculum design as they pertain to the education of English language learners. Students will develop appropriate content-area learner goals, as well as design curricula and instruction that facilitates student learning while building upon the students prior knowledge, linguistic diversity, and cultural diversity. Instructional strategies will be developed that promote language development. Assessment methods will be introduced and evaluated to obtain useful information about students' placement, learning, and development. The course structure combines lectures, discussions, required readings, online activities, and a practical application of skills as demonstrated through projects and presentations.

Prerequisite(s): EDUC 505 Intercultural Communication for Educators.

Students study principles of linguistic analysis and apply them to teaching. Topics include: English phonetics and phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and subfields of linguistics such as sociolinguistics (regional and ethnic dialects, issues of gender), historical linguistics, psycholinguistics (language acquisition, language and the brain), and pedagogies of English Language Learning.

Prerequisite(s): Bachelor's degree.

A study of a variety of methods for teaching English as a Second Language in K-12 education. This course focuses on planning and teaching language and the application to both ESL and content areas. This course is designed for students who are working toward their ESL endorsement.

Students are given the opportunity to teach elementary or high school English language learners. A Teaching Practicum Portfolio is assembled as part of the course requirements.

Prerequisites: EDUC 505 Intercultural Communication for Educators, EDUC 520 Curriculum Design-Teaching ELL, EDUC 521 Linguistics for Teaching ELL and EDUC 522 Methods for Teaching ELL.

A course that introduces modern geography and examines spatial relationships among such physical phenomena as climate, topography, soils, and vegetation.

A course that examines the spatial relationships of such phenomena as population, economic activity, and societal groups.

A course designed to allow students an opportunity to assist a preschool, elementary, middle grades, or junior high special education teacher for a designated period of time each week. May be repeated a maximum of three times.

Pass/Fail only.

Corequisite(s): SPED 107 Understanding Human Differences for special education majors.

This course provides an overview of basic concepts related to the inclusive education of differently abled students. A broad understanding of a range of low and high incidence disabilities will be explored. Historical factors, legislation, litigation, service delivery models, and cross-cultural issues are examined in the course. Students will complete a fieldwork experience that will allow them an opportunity to assist kindergarten, elementary, middle school, or junior high special education students for a designated period of time.

Students will learn to develop and deliver specific academic and social curriculum using Direct Instruction/Behaviorist methodology. Demonstration of competence of instructional design and evaluation within a Direct Instruction/Behaviorist model is emphasized in relation to students with mild/moderate disabilities. Students may complete a fieldwork experience that will allow students an opportunity to assist a preschool, elementary, or middle school education teacher for a designated period of time using these instructional methods.

Students will learn to develop and deliver specific academic and social curriculum using Cognitive Strategy methodology. Demonstration of competence of instructional design and evaluation within a Cognitive Strategy framework is emphasized for students with mild/moderate disabilities. Students may complete fieldwork experience that will allow them an opportunity to assist a preschool, elementary, or middle school special education teacher for a designated period of time using these instructional methods.

Students will learn to develop and deliver specific academic and social curriculum using Social Learning theory and methodology. Demonstration of competence in instructional design and evaluation with a Social Learning theory model is emphasized for students with mild/moderate disabilities. Students may complete a fieldwork experience that will allow them an opportunity to assist a preschool, elementary, or middle school special education teacher for a designated period of time using these instructional methods.

This course is the study of the various forms of instructional technology available to today's educators. Instructional technologies include computers, data bases, wireless telecommunication, augmentative communication software, literacy, and mathematic support software. Specific emphasis is placed on those forms of adaptive technology that will assist the teaching and learning of students with mild/moderate disabilities.

An opportunity for a student to engage in an individually-arranged project supervised by a member of the faculty.

Prerequisite(s): Approval of the department chair.

A course designed to acquaint secondary education students with appropriate teaching strategies and methodologies for the regular classroom when teaching students who are gifted or have mild/moderate disabilities. Legal responsibilities and obligations concerning both populations are also discussed. A field experience is included as part of this course.

This course is a study of the informal and formal techniques and instruments for assessing children/youth for a variety of functions across multiple curriculum areas. Primary focus will be on effective tools for the identification and support of children/youth with mild/moderate disabilities.

Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into the Teacher Education Program or permission of the department chair.

As a corequisite with Education 245, this course will involve the critical study of materials, curriculum, and effective instruction used in teaching children and youth with mild/moderate disabilities.

Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into the Teacher Education Program or permission of the department chair.

Corequisite(s): EDUC 245 Methods for Teaching Literacy in Elementary and Middle Grades.

This course provides students with knowledge of national, state, and local laws, policies, procedures, and resources that affect the definition of disability and the ensuing education programs for students with mild/moderate disabilities. Models of social and personal advocacy will form a critical foundation for development of a personal consultation model. Students will reflect their understanding of these issues through the development of Individual Education Plans, Transition Plans, and School Service Plans for students with mild/moderate disabilities.

Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into the Teacher Education Program or permission of the department chair.

This course provides an overview of the basic concepts related to early intervention and an in-depth study of instructional programming for infants and preschoolers with disabilities. Historical factors, legislation, assessment, and collaboration skills with other professionals and families are examples of topics emphasized.

Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into the Teacher Education Program or permission of the department chair.

As a corequisite of EDUC 240 Teaching Mathematics in Elementary and Middle Grades and EDUC 244 Teaching Natural Sciences in Elementary and Middle Grades, this course involves the critical study of materials, curriculum and effective instruction used in teaching children and youth with mild/moderate disabilities.

Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into the Teacher Education Program or permission of the department chair.

Corequisite(s): EDUC 240 Teaching Mathematics in Elementary and Middle Grades and EDUC 244 Teaching Natural Sciences in Elementary and Middle Grades.

This course provides an intensive study of ways that collaborative practice can support children with emotional/behavioral needs. An emphasis of the course will be on the creation of safe schools through cognitive, behavioral, and social support strategies.

Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into the Teacher Education Program or permission of the department chair.

Students are given the opportunity to teach children/youth who have mild/moderate disabilities in the elementary and middle grades. They teach a full day during all the Nebraska Wesleyan semester.

Prerequisite(s): Completion of preliminary student teaching requirements and approval of the department chair.

Students are given the opportunity to teach children who have mild/moderate disabilities in grades 7-12 for 10 weeks.

Prerequisite(s): Completion of preliminary student teaching requirements and approval of the department chair.

Students are given the opportunity to teach children who have mild/moderate disabilities in the elementary grades for 10 weeks.

Prerequisite(s): Completion of preliminary student teaching requirements and approval of the department chair.

Students are given the opportunity to teach preschool children with disabilities in an early childhood special education program (birth through kindergarten) for 10 weeks.

Prerequisite(s): Completion of preliminary student teaching requirements and approval of the department chair.

A course designed to treat subject matter not covered in other standard courses to provide advanced study of subject matter introduced in other courses. The title, content and credit hours will be determined by current mutual interests of faculty and students. Prerequisite(s): Approval of the department chair.

This course provides an opportunity for a student to engage in an individually arranged project supervised by a member of the faculty.

Prerequisite(s): Approval of the department chair.