Gender Studies

Department/Program: Gender Studies

Majors, Minors & Degrees:

The study of women, gender, and feminist scholarship is an interdisciplinary field that draws upon research in the humanities, the social sciences, the natural sciences, the arts, and professional education. Gender Studies courses encourage male, female, and gender-nonconforming students to make strong personal connections between classroom material and their own experience. Through applying feminist theories to their own lives, students learn, interpret, and evaluate various cultural phenomena, using a broad range of criteria, including gender, ethnicity, race, class, age, and sexual orientation.

The Bachelor of Arts designates a broad-based liberal arts education. The Bachelor of Science is advisable for those who wish to signal social science expertise in a related career such as social work or counseling psychology.

Courses

This speaking-instructive dramatic literature class examines how varieties of feminisms and cultural diversity have been represented in dramatic literary works. By reading, discussion, reflecting in writing and making oral presentations about a variety of dramatic works drawn from diverse perspectives students will utilize recent scholarship in gender and seuality studies to analyze how assumptions about gender and/or sexualities have contributed to inequalities, choices, biases, oppression and/or empowerment in the culture and time periods in which the plays were written and produced.

An introductory course designed to help students appreciate the literary record of human relationships with nature, the supernatural, and each other. Each course examines a particular question or condition as it is represented in a restricted number of literary works, with core readings from the Bible, Greek or Roman classical literature, Shakespeare, literature by women, and literature by writers of color. Different topics are offered on a rotating basis for ENG 2010 Masterpieces of Literature, however, only the topics of "Coming of Age-Becoming Women, Becoming Men" and "Sexualities" are available as GEND 2100 Coming of Age or Sexualities.
Prerequisite(s): ENG 1010 English Language and Writing.
Coming of Age- Becoming Women, Becoming Men This course looks at texts that represent the forces and processes that are part of maturation, especially those related to gender identity. This course focuses on gender issues and includes feminist perspectives. Sexualities This course is designed to help students appreciate the literary record of romantic relationships. Specifically, the course will explore how writers from different historical periods and cultural milieus address the issue of human sexuality. Note: same-sex relationships will be routinely read about and discussed in the class.

Each course in the Topics in World Literature group will study a selection of literary works that engage the chosen topic--texts of different genres, from historical eras, and from different cultural traditions. The selected readings will present both abstract principles involved in the topic and its immediate, lived realities.
Prerequisite(s): Any First Year Writing course.

Most Americans have some understanding of how the categories of race and gender influence our personal and social identities. Yet many Americans also assume that race and gender are "natural," i.e., that we are born into a certain race and naturally embody a certain sex. In this course, we will examine these assumptions by reading, discussing, and critically assessing the arguments for and against the "naturalness" of race and gender. We will consider how categories of race and gender position us, historically and philosophically, as a person of a certain "type" from whom certain behaviors are expected. We will look at socio-economic conditions and philosophic positions that support or challenge racism, sexism, classism, segregation, and violence.

This course will examine the roles of women in religious traditions. Students will encounter scholarship on gender, religion, and feminist theology in different traditions. The primary focus of this course will be on the religious traditions of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, although other traditions and contemporary religious movements may be considered.

This course will expose students to the various types of violence experienced by individuals and families across their lifespan. An introduction to various theories used in working with survivors of abuse will be presented and students will learn about bruises and fractures associated with child abuse. The influence of societal "isms", culture, gender, and sexual orientation related to violence will be incorporated into the material being discussed.
(Normally offered each spring semester.)

This course uses the sociological perspective to explore sex and gender relations as major features of social life. It considers the social construction of gender (including the creation of masculinities and femininities) and examines the impact of gender ideologies on the social positions of women and men. In particular, it emphasizes the way these social positions (such as gender, race, social class, sexualities, etc.) create and perpetuate the inequalities embedded in its social institutions (like the family, economy/work, religion, media, etc.) The requirements of the 3360 course will be the same as the 2360 course EXCEPT that students in the higher course number will write a comprehensive literature review as training for future social science research projects.
(Normally offered alternate years.)
Cross-listed with SOC 2360 Gender and Society

An introduction to the experiences of women in the United States from colonization to the present, with an examination of cultural meanings attached to gender; various social inequalities in access to institutions, activities, and resources; and women's status, well being, and power in American society. The course investigates the lives of women from various social, ethnic, and racial groups, analyzing the ways that they affected one another. The course emphasizes sexuality, reproduction, and maternity, and also covers politics, law, work, education, and other issues in women's lives.
Cross-listed with HIST 2370 History of Women in the United States

This course uses a sociological perspective to explore gendered issues that women face as perpetrators, victims, and workers in the criminal justice system. As such, students will explore theories and empirical studies related to offending, victimization, and employment. The requirements of the 3380 course will be the same as the 2380 course EXCEPT that students in the higher course number will write a comprehensive literature review as training for future social science research projects or conduct an additional major project as determined by the instructor.

An investigation of psychological theories and issues relating to the psychology of women from a feminist perspective. Gender bias in traditional psychological theories, research, and practice will be evaluated in relation to women's attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors. Students will gain a better understanding of women's psychology across the lifespan and how other interacting constructs such as race, ethnicity, class, sexual orientation, nationality, and disability influence women's experiences. The social and political implications of how we understand women and gender will be explored, and emphasis will be placed on envisioning possibilities for individual (psychological) and social change.

A course examining the construct of gender. Topics include gender development and socialization, cross-cultural gender differences, institutions affecting gender roles, the social maintenance systems for gender roles, and gender issues in contemporary literature and the arts.
Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing.
(Normally offered each spring semester.)

This course examines the participation of women in society and politics, and their ability to influence the policy decisions related to the issues of concern to them. The course will take a cross-national perspective, although primary emphasis will be women in Middle Eastern and South Asian societies.

From Hildegard von Bingen to Nicki Minaj, this course examines the ways in which social constructions of gender have shaped the interpretation, reception, and historical narratives of popular, classical, and traditional music styles. Through historiography and musical analysis, we will discuss systems of domination and subordination along with stereotyped and biased assumptions about women and men pertinent to the music of specific cultures and time periods.
Cross-listed with MUSIC 2830 Music and Gender

Including films, music videos, and musicals this course examines varied depictions of sexualities in the arts (defined broadly), especially those that intersect with music. Students will also discuss the ways in which social constructs of gender have shaped those works and their reception. By analyzing specific pieces we will discuss systems of domination and subordination along with stereotyped and biased assumptions about women, men, and individuals across the gender spectrum.

A supervised, experiential learning opportunity in which the student works with an agency dealing with gender concerns. Students prepare weekly written reports and a reflective paper at the close of the semester. All students enrolled in the practicum will meet regularly with the faculty coordinator to discuss their internship activities and their relevance to gender studies.
This course does not fulfill a core requirement for the major.
Corequisite(s): GEND 3000 Perspectives in Gender or permission of the program chair

This course provides an overview of key contemporary theories, concepts, issues, and debates in Gender Studies as well as an overview of the historical roots that inform this interdisciplinary area of study. Students will also conceptualize and develop an applied gender-project. While topics may vary by instructor expertise and state of the discipline, currently, focus will be placed upon intersectionality (categories such as gender, sexual orientation, gender identity, ethnicity, citizenship status, social class, caste, ability, and age interlock and work together), transnationalism (no matter one's location or awareness, one is connected to others in different parts of the world) and masculinities (analysis of masculine social formation and feminist masculinities). Students will glean an overview of the field of Gender Studies and its emergence from Women's Studies and advocacy for women's rights. Students will become familiar with key concepts from current gender scholarship. As professors encounter current scholarship they will change the course content to reflect the latest debates in the field. Upon completing the course, students must be able to show that they can conceptualize and complete a substantial project with real-world applications that they can then share with other students.

This course introduces women's health with an emphasis on global issues. Women's health will be examined using the influences of social, political, economic, cultural, and geographical factors. Students will examine the basic health needs of all women and compare the availability of and types of services in different parts of the world. A unique component of this course is the opportunity to work with women from another country to learn about other women's health concerns.
Prerequisite(s): GEND 3000 Perspectives in Gender or SOC 1110 Introduction to Sociology or a beginning level anthropology course or permission of the instructor.

An exploration of the varieties of contemporary feminist thought. We will examine the points of convergence among feminist philosophers but also attend seriously to the issues that divide them. Special consideration will be given to race, class, and diverse attitudes toward marriage and reproduction. having established that feminism is not a single, homogeneous system, we will inquire as to whether this constitutes a flaw or a liberating potential.

This course uses the sociological perspective to explore sex and gender relations as major features of social life. It considers the social construction of gender (including the creation of masculinities and femininities) and examines the impact of gender ideologies on the social positions of women and men. In particular, it emphasizes the way these social positions (such as gender, race, social class, sexualities, etc.) create and perpetuate the inequalities embedded in its social institutions (like the family, economy/work, religion, media, etc.) The requirements of the 3360 course will be the same as the 2360 course EXCEPT that students in the higher course number will write a comprehensive literature review as training for future social science research projects.
(Normally offered alternate years.)
Cross-listed with SOC 3360 Gender and Society.

This course uses a sociological perspective to explore gendered issues that women face as perpetrators, victims, and workers in the criminal justice system. As such, students will explore theories and empirical studies related to offending, victimization, and employment. The requirements of the 3380 course will be the same as the 2380 course EXCEPT that students in the higher course number will write a comprehensive literature review as training for future social science research projects or conduct an additional major project as determined by the instructor.

This course offers an exploration of theories of the creation and perpetuation of gender and gender roles through communication. In turn, students will consider the question of the impact of gender on communication. Students will examine gender in a variety of contexts including families, schools, and media.

Fiction and essays by women from various cultures (including the U.S., Europe, Africa, Latin America, and the Caribbean) will be the focus of this course. The multicultural, international reading list will provide students insight into the lives and experiences of women most likely very different from themselves; thus they can appreciate and learn from the differences and make connections across cultures.
Prerequisite(s): First Year Writing and Sophomore standing.
Cross-listed with ENG 3410 Women Writing Across Cultures
 

This course highlights women's experiences in the American West from precontact to present, and explores topics of myth and stereotypes; women's roles in the home, family and community; and racial, class and ethnic differences in women's experiences.
Prerequisite(s): HIST 1010 Topics in United States History to 1877 or HIST 1020 United States Society and Culture Since 1877 or permission of the instructor.

This course will examine representations of masculinity, femininity, and androgyny in primarily U.S. film. Students will learn to recognize and evaluate elements of film art. Using variety of film theories, we will analyze Hollywood and independent movie images of men and women for the messages conveyed about gender roles and expectations.

This course provides a rigorous and detailed examination of select pieces across the Western music tradition related to gender and/or sexuality, and also explores the relationships between music, hisotry, and culture. Through historiography and musical analysis, we will discuss systems of domination and subordination along with stereotyped and biased assumptions about women and men pertinent to the music of specific cultures and time periods.
Prerequisities: Junior standing and permission of the instructor.

A topical course designed to investigate relevant subject matter not included in any standard courses. The title and the content will be determined by current mutual interests of students and faculty. This course may be offered to meet a requirement for a major only by approval of the department chair.

An opportunity for a student to engage in an individually arranged research project supervised by a member of the Gender Studies faculty. Independent Study may not duplicate courses described in the catalog.
Prerequisite(s): Minor in Gender Studies, junior or senior standing, and permission of the Gender Studies instructor.

An opportunity for a student to engage in an individually arranged project supervised by a member of the Gender Studies faculty. Special Projects may not duplicate courses described in the catalog.
Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor.

This course highlights women's experiences in the American West from precontact to present, and explores topics of myth and stereotypes; women's roles in the home, family and community; and racial, class and ethnic differences in women's experiences.
Prerequisite(s): HIST 1010 Topics in United States History to 1877 and HIST 1020 United States Society and Culture Since 1877 or permission of the instructor.
Cross-listed with HIST 4550 Women of the American West

A topical course designed to investigate relevant subject matter not included in any standard courses. The title and the content will be determined by current mutual interests of students and faculty. This course may be offered to meet a requirement for a major only by approval of the department chair.

An opportunity for a student to engage in an individually arranged project supervised by a member of the Gender Studies faculty. Special Projects may not duplicate courses described in the catalog.
Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor.

A supervised, experiential learning opportunity in which the student works with an agency dealing with gender concerns. Students prepare weekly written reports and a reflective paper at the close of the semester. All students enrolled in the practicum will meet regularly with the faculty coordinator to discuss their internship activities and their relevance to gender studies.
Pre or corequisite(s): GEND 3000 Perspectives in Gender.

This course is designed to guide students in their reading and collecting as they prepare for GEND 4990 Thesis Writing, the course in which they will write their senior thesis. Students will complete several low-stakes writing assignments to help them summarize, reflect on, sort and evaluate the evidence they encounter.
Prerequisite(s): Senior standing and the permission of the instructor.

A student will complete a research project or senior thesis under the direction of at least two Gender Studies faculty members. The student will present an oral defense of the thesis.
Prerequisite(s): Senior standing and permission of the supervising Gender Studies faculty members.