Art

Department/Program: Art

Majors, Minors & Degrees:

Art majors pursue either the Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees. A Bachelor of Science degree may be advisable in the case of a double major. The Bachelor of Arts with a major in art is, as in other academic disciplines, designed as a broad-based liberal arts education. The B.A. in art requires an exposure to both two-dimensional and three-dimensional media as well as art history. It can lead to graduate study in art, art history, art therapy, or other academic or professional areas. The B.A. is recommended for those students who wish to pursue K-12 teaching certification. Students who wish to meet Nebraska certification regulations for the teaching of art in secondary schools must include Art 200, Art in the Secondary Schools, as one of their art electives. Students should consult the Department of Education regarding additional Nebraska certification requirements.

The Bachelor of Fine Arts in art is traditionally pursued by those students who plan to become either professional artists or artist/teachers. The B.F.A. stresses intensive and specialized studio practice in the creative art disciplines, and is considered the appropriate preparation for study toward the Master of Fine Arts degree. The B.F.A. is considered a professional design degree and is the preferred credential for entry-level positions in design or advertising agencies or studios, as well as for preparation toward entrance to a Master of Fine Arts program.

Each year, art majors are required to present a portfolio representative of the past year’s work to the art faculty. As well, all candidates for degrees with a major in art are required to participate in a senior exhibition as part of Art 298 Senior Project and Art 299 Senior Comprehensive.

All entering and first-year students who are majoring in art are considered candidates for the Bachelor of Arts degree. Those students who wish to pursue the Bachelor of Fine Arts degree must be admitted to the program based on the B.F.A. Clearance. In order to qualify for the B.F.A. Clearance, students must have completed or be currently enrolled in the required art core courses (Basic Design, Drawing 1, and Drawing 2) as well as one introductory art history course, and introductory (100-level) courses in both 2-D and 3-D media. The applicant must have a minimum GPA of 3.00 in all art classes completed within the Art Department at the time of the review. The B.F.A. Clearance will be held concurrently with the annual portfolio review that is required for art majors. The art department faculty will evaluate the portfolio and inform the student of its decision in a timely fashion to allow for time to plan schedules.

Courses

A survey of art and architectural history using a great masterpieces approach. Significant monuments from antiquity to the twentieth century will be considered with particular attention to the interaction of art and its producing society so that political situation, theology, science, and aesthetics will be considered in lectures. Cannot be used toward a major in art. Credit cannot be earned for Art History 101 and ARH 106 Art and Society in the West: Ancient to Medieval or Art History 101 and ARH 107 Art and Society in the West: Renaissance to Modern.

A survey of African, Asian, Native American, and Pre-Columbian arts.

A survey of art and architectural history in the western hemisphere: significant monuments from prehistory to the medieval period will be considered with particular attention to the interaction of art and its producing society so that political situation, theology, science, and aesthetics will be considered in lectures. Credit cannot be earned for both ARH 101 Masterpieces of World Art and Art History 106.

A survey of art and architectural history in the western hemisphere: significant monuments from the Renaissance to the twentieth century will be considered with particular attention to the interaction of art and its producing society so that political situation, theology, science, and aesthetics will be considered in lectures. Credit cannot be earned for both ARH 101 Masterpieces of World Art and Art History 107.

A topical course designed to investigate any relevant subject matter not included in any of the usually offered art history courses. The title, content, and credit will be determined by the faculty member who is offering the course. This course may be offered to meet a requirement for a major only by approval of the department chair.

An exploration of art and architecture as they developed in antiquity (prehistory to c.300 AD), this course will examine developments in Egypt, Mesopotamia, Greece, and Rome. Prehistoric art in western Europe will be considered as well. Emphasis will be given to the great monuments of each culture and the primary focus will be the interaction between art and its surrounding society. In so doing, politics, religion, science, and aesthetics will be included in classroom discussions.

Prerequisite(s): ARH 101 Masterpieces of World Art or ARH 106 Art and Society in the West: Ancient to Medieval or permission of the instructor.

An examination of the visual arts as they developed in western Europe, particularly Italy, from 1300 to 1600. Painting, sculpture, and architecture will be considered with special emphasis given to the great masters of the period: Botticelli, da Vinci, and Michelangelo among others. The primary focus of the course will be the interaction between art and its surrounding society. In so doing, politics, religion, science, and aesthetics will be included in classroom discussions.

Prerequisite(s): ARH 101 Masterpieces of World Art or ARH 107 Art and Society in the West: Renaissance to Modern or permission of the instructor.

Art and architecture primarily in western Europe from 1600 to about 1780 will be considered with primary concentration on the great masters of the era: Caravaggio, Bernini, Rubens, and Rembrandt. Cultural dynamics as they are reflected and affected by the visual arts will be discussed.

Prerequisite(s): ARH 101 Masterpieces of World Art or ARH 107 Art and Society in the West: Renaissance to Modern or permission of the instructor.

Art and architecture in western Europe, primarily France, will be considered with particular attention given to the rise of modernism. Major movements and their primary practitioners will be considered: Neoclassicism, Romanticism, Realism, Impressionism, and Post-Impressionism.

Prerequisite(s): ARH 101 Masterpieces of World Art or ARH 107 Art and Society in the West: Renaissance to Modern or permission of the instructor.

International movements in art and architecture since 1900 will be considered with attention given to the emergence of personal expression in the visual media. Universally recognized masters will be emphasized: Matisse, Picasso, Duchamp, Pollack, and Warhol to name a few.

Prerequisite(s): ARH 101 Masterpieces of World Art or ARH 107 Art and Society in the West: Renaissance to Modern or permission of the instructor.

A topical course designed to investigate any relevant subject matter not included in any of the usually offered art history courses. The title, content, and credit will be determined by the faculty member who is offering the course. This course may be offered to meet a requirement for a major only by approval of the department chair.

Arranged course involving travel and on-site investigation of art and architecture.

Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor.

Supervised, advanced-level projects not included in any of the standard courses. Normally developed for an individual student but may be arranged for a small group of students.

Prerequisite(s): 9 hours of art history and permission of the instructor.

A studio art exploration of basic design elements and principles using traditional media, ideation, and rough draft processes.

Study of appropriate methodology, processes, philosophy, and content for visual arts instruction in the elementary schools. Includes strategies for teaching art criticism, art history, art media, and techniques, and developing curriculum for the elementary school art program. Laboratory experiences and teaching experiences in elementary schools are provided. Required for certification of elementary teachers and K-12 endorsements. Cannot be applied toward a major or minor in art.

A studio art investigation of basic design and color theory, composition, and use of light as it relates to painting. Experimentation with the technical processes of painting such as underpainting, scumbling, blending paint, glazing, and varnishing.

A continuation of studio art investigation of color theory and use of light with added emphasis on the relationship between composition and content informed by historical painting concepts. Experimentation with the technical processes of direct and indirect painting.

Prerequisite(s): ART 110 Painting 1.

This course will serve as an overview of working with digital technologies. Topics covered wil be: design, illustration, photography, web design and digital motion. Software programs covered include: Adobe Illustrator, Photoshop, and Dreamweaver and Premiere Elements. Professional photographic lighting techniques and the operation of a DSLR camera. Students will also learn creative problem solving methods including various methods for ideation and prototyping. Students will be exposed to creative applications.

A studio art exploration that focuses on the aesthetic concepts of vector image-making and continued development of raster painting. Type and output are addressed. Students create content-driven projects using conventional and computer aided processes, including the scanner, pen tablet, digital camera, and digital printer. Students gain a working understanding of Illustrator and Painter.

Prerequisite(s): ART 120 Digital Media 1.

An introduction to drawing by surveying its use as a foundation for future study in all 2D and 3D media.

A class focused on the human figure and portrait. Basic anatomy, movement, and composition will be covered by having each class session with a model. This class will benefit students who are interested in all artistic media by giving them an understanding of the human form.

Prerequisite(s): ART 130 Drawing 1: Basic Drawing.

Introduction to the techniques of printmaking; relief print, serigraph, intaglio, and lithography. Emphasis on the study of the print as a multiple original with introductory edition printing. Focus on basic design concepts with introductory historical investigation related to printmaking.

An examination of one print form (relief, serigraphy, intaglio, lithography, or digital printmaking) focused on the study of composition and content as it relates to the technical and formal considerations of that particular medium. Emphasis on the use of color and color theory. Edition printing.

Prerequisite(s): ART 140 Printmaking 1.

This class in an introduction to the artistic and conceptual basics of digital photography. The digital camera, scanner, computer and software will be used to produce images for print and electronic display. Subject matter, form and content will be emphasized in the production of these images. Students will develop an understanding of photography as a creative and challenging art form and will practice using the medium of photography for personal expression.

Studio art exploration in photography focused on complex methods of conceiving and producing photographs. Introduction of technical concerns with metering, development, and post-development controls. Emphasis on conceptualization, compositional assessment, and evaluation of content as well as student development of a personal point of view within the photographic medium. Group project.

Prerequisite(s): ART 150 Photography 1: Digital or ART 155 Photography 1: Darkroom

An introduction to the basic tools and techniques of black and white photography. Focus on the technical craft of using the camera, processing film, developing prints, and presenting photographs. Discussion and development of student vocabulary related to subject matter, form, and content of the photographic image in the context of historical and contemporary photographic concerns. Emphasis on student development of a creative problem-solving process related to photographic image-making.

Introduction to basic throwing and handbuilding techniques in clay, including pinching, coiling, and slab construction. Focus on developing conceptual problem solving in clay. Emphasis on ceramics in a historical context in relationship to contemporary attitudes in clay.

Exploration of complex methods of handbuilding and throwing techniques, as well as conceptual problem solving in clay. Basic theoretical study of clays, glazes, kilns, and firing. Emphasis on ceramics in a historical context in relationship to contemporary attitudes in clay.

Prerequisite(s): ART 160 Ceramics 1.

Introduction to basic sculptural processes of modeling, carving, and casting in a variety of materials including clay, plaster, stone, and cement. Emphasis on three-dimensional design elements and principles.

Studio art exploration in three-dimensional form utilizing a variety of materials, both traditional and nontraditional, in the study of sculptural techniques. Emphasis on the relationship of sculpture in a historical context to contemporary trends and issues.

Prerequisite(s): ART 170 Sculpture 1.

Introduction to the basic tools and techniques of metalsmithing for use in body ornament or as small sculptural form. Broad studio art exploration in the techniques of sheet metal construction including cutting, piercing, soldering, mechanical joining, surface embellishment, and finishing. Emphasis on historical metalsmithing in relationship to contemporary attitudes in metalsmithing.

Exploration of complex metalsmithing techniques with an emphasis on conceptual problem-solving and personal expression in metalsmithing. Studio exploration in stretching and angle raising of sheet metal, forging, repousee and chasing, stone setting, and casting. Study of historical and contemporary metalsmithing as a foundation for design and ideation.

Prerequisite(s): ART 180 Metalsmithing 1.

A topical course designed to investigate any relevant subject matter not included in any of the standard beginning-level courses. The title, content, and credit will be determined by the faculty member who is offering the course. This course may be offered to meet a requirement for a major only by approval of the department chair.

A topical course designed to investigate any relevant subject matter not included in any of the standard beginning-level courses. The title, content, and credit will be determined by the faculty member who is offering the course. This course may be offered to meet a requirement for a major only by approval of the department chair.

Supervised, beginning-level projects not included in any of the standard courses. Normally developed for an individual student but may be arranged for a small group of students.

Prerequisite(s): 9 hours of art and permission of the instructor.

A survey of teaching visual arts education in the secondary schools (grades 7-12). Emphasis on administration, organization, curriculum, and philosophy of art in education. Required for K-12 art certification. Cannot be applied toward a major or minor in art.

Prerequisite(s): 15 hours of art and acceptance into the Teacher Education Program or permission of the chair of Department of Education.

In a seminar format, this course will survey different methodological and theoretical approaches to the art criticism and art production of the twentieth century.

Prerequisite(s): ART 005 Basic Design, and ART 130 Drawing 1: Basic Drawing or permission of the instructor.

A survey of the field of art therapy in its various applications and theoretical orientations. Taught by a registered art therapist through lectures, readings, and experiential methods.

Prerequisite(s): 9 hours of psychology, including PSYCH 002 Applied Psychological Science (Adult Undergraduate Only), and 9 hours of art, or permission of the instructor.

Continued investigation of the relationship between composition and content informed by historical painting concepts. Emphasis on introductory individual student research in form and content through experimentation with tools, additive elements, and surfaces.

Prerequisite(s): ART 111 Painting 2.

Continuation of exploration of historical painting concepts and individual research. Emphasis on student directed content, problems, and solutions within the context of painting techniques that result in a body of work.

Prerequisite(s): ART 210 Painting 3.

A studio art course designed to give students a working comprehension of digital media as it pertains to online digital space. Students explore how to use cross-platform visual HTML editors to create interactive websites utilizing Macromedia Dreamweaver. This is a content driven class, so the concept of the image and interaction of the image are central goals. Students will also use the scanner, pen tablet, and digital camera.

Prerequisite(s): ART 121 Digital Media 2.

A studio art course designed to give students a working comprehension of digital media as it pertains to animation in the digital space. Students explore how to use the multimedia authoring tool of Flash to create animations with sound that can be delivered to the web or viewed on the screen. The concept of the image and interaction with the image are central goals of this class.

Prerequisite(s): ART 220 Digital Media 3.

A class treating drawing as a medium in itself. The student will create individually guided work informed by contemporary theory and art history with the close supervision of the professor. Group critiques will be included in the class.

Prerequisite(s): ART 131 Drawing 2: Figure Drawing.

The student is expected to prepare a cohesive portfolio of drawings for graduate application and exhibition opportunities. A written component will be due with the portfolio. Study of advanced critical theory and group critiques will be included in the class.

Prerequisite(s): ART 230 Drawing 3.

Examination of one print form (relief, serigraphy, intaglio, lithography, or digital printmaking) with emphasis on the study of composition and content as it relates to the technical and formal considerations of the particular medium. Edition printing. Opportunity for introductory student research and an emphasis on the relationship of media to the form and content.

Prerequisite(s): ART 141 Printmaking 2.

Examination of one student-selected print form (relief, serigraphy, intaglio, lithography, or digital printmaking) with emphasis on the study of composition and content as it relates to the technical and formal considerations of the particular medium. Emphasis on student directed content, problems and solutions within the context of a printmaking medium that results in a body of work.

Prerequisite(s): ART 240 Printmaking 3.

A studio art exploration introducing advanced methods of conceiving and producing photographs. Technical focus on controlling light, both natural and artificial, the introduction of digital imaging, and alternative photographic processes. Emphasis on in-depth concept-utilization, compositional assessment, and evaluation of content. Introductory portfolio development.

Prerequisite(s): ART 151 Photography 2.

Emphasis on student directed content, problems, and solutions that result in a body of work through focus on conceiving and producing photographs. Individual research projects may include professional portfolio development.

Prerequisite(s): ART 250 Photography 3.

Focus on the balance of technical competence in both thrown and handbuilt clay forms and engagement with aesthetic concerns. Emphasis on introductory individual student research in form and conceptual problems. Study of clay and glaze chemistry. Emphasis on ceramics in a historical context in relationship to contemporary attitudes in clay.

Prerequisite(s): ART 161 Ceramics 2.

Continued concern with a balance of technical competence in both thrown and handbuilt clay forms and an engagement with aesthetic concerns. Emphasis on student directed content, problems, and solutions within the context of ceramics that result in a body of work. Exploration of current trends and issues in ceramics as related to individual student research.

Prerequisite(s): ART 260 Ceramics 3.

Emphasis on introductory individual student research in form and content through balanced experimentation with technical competence and aesthetic concerns. Experimentation with one or two sculptural techniques such as assemblage, stone carving, clay modeling, or casting.

Prerequisite(s): ART 171 Sculpture 2.

Continuation of exploration of current trends and issues in sculpture in relationship to individual student research concerns. Emphasis on student directed content, problems, and solutions within the context of sculpture that result in a body of work.

Prerequisite(s): ART 270 Sculpture 3.

Emphasis on introductory individual student research in form and content through balanced experimentation with technical competence and aesthetic concerns. Experimentation with patination of metals and advanced surface embellishment.

Prerequisite(s): ART 181 Metalsmithing 2.

Continuation of exploration of current trends and issues in metalsmithing in relationship to individual student research concerns. Emphasis on student directed content, problems, and solutions within the context of metalsmithing that result in a body of work.

Prerequisite(s): ART 280 Metalsmithing 3.

A topical course designed to investigate any relevant subject matter not included in any of the standard advanced-level courses. The title, content, and credit will be determined by the faculty member who is offering the course. This course may be offered to meet a requirement for a major only by approval of the department chair.

A topical course designed to investigate any relevant subject matter not included in any of the standard advanced-level courses. The title, content, and credit will be determined by the faculty member who is offering the course. This course may be offered to meet a requirement for a major only by approval of the department chair.

Independent Study

Supervised, advanced-level projects not included in any of the standard courses. Normally developed for an individual student but may be arranged for a small group of students.

Prerequisite(s): 9 hours of art and permission of the instructor.

An on-the-job supervised training experience with a business or non-profit organization, such as an art gallery, professional art studio, or business utilizing art or design. A minimum of 3 hours of work per week for each hour of credit.

Pass/Fail only.

Prerequisite(s): A major in art or permission of the department chair and permission of the sponsoring agency.

To be taken during the spring semester of the junior year. Students will begin to formulate an inclusive portfolio of their work and a thesis for presentation in the Senior Comprehensive. Students will participate in regularly scheduled portfolio critiques attended by members of the art faculty and will be required to address relevant questions in a comprehensive written thesis. Meets concurrently with the Senior Comprehensive course.

Prerequisite(s): Junior status and permission of department chair.

Designed to prepare seniors in art for graduation, this course includes experiences in planning, promoting, and opening a senior gallery exhibition. Students and instructor will work together to prepare professional resumes and portfolios, which include a written artist statement. Includes a gallery talk, presentation to the public, and an exit evaluation by the art department faculty.

Prerequisite(s): ART 298 and art history courses.