Criminal Justice (Adult Undergraduate)

Department/Program: Criminal Justice (Adult Undergraduate)

Majors, Minors & Degrees:
Courses

A survey course providing an overall view of the criminal justice system, the law, law enforcement, the courts, and corrections.
(Normally offered each fall semester.)

The analysis of the structure-function of law enforcement and the dilemma confronting the police in relation with the community.
Prerequiste(s): CRMJS 1011 Introduction to Criminal Justice and SOC 1110 Introduction to Sociology or SOC 1120 Responding to Social Problems.
(Normally offered alternate years.)

Analysis of the history, theory, structure, and function of contemporary penal institutions. Cross listed with SOC-2130.
Prerequisite(s): CRMJS 1010 Introduction to Criminal Justice and SOC 1110 Introduction to Sociology or SOC 1120 Responding to Social Problems.
(Normally offered every third spring semester.)

This course examines the unique framework and workings of the juvenile justice system. The juvenile justice system is in the process of on-going profound changes in both legal rights and corrections. We will examine the reasons why juveniles commit crimes and status offenses. The current issues in juvenile justice such as: gangs, growth in "female" criminal involvement, and the hardening of juvenile offenders.
Prerequisite(s): CRMJS 1010 Introduction to Criminal Justice.
(Normally offered alternate years.)

This course covers the fundamentals of the history of policing, policing strategies, police qualities, police ethics, policing trends, and policing problems solving exercises.
Prerequisite(s): CRMJS 1011 Introduction to Criminal Justice

This course explores the types of probation and parole, the demand for probation and parole, the advantages and disadvantages of probation and parole, the job duties and qualifications necessary for probation and parole officers, and how probation and parole is integrated into the criminal justice system.
Prerequisite(s): CRMJS 1011 Introduction to Criminal Justice
 

This explores the fundamental ethics of working within the criminal justice system. The class will explore the ethics of the various fields such as: forensics, police, probation, parole, corrections, defense attorneys, and presecutors. We will go deeply into the ethical dilemmas faced by a variety of experts in the criminal justice field.
Prerequisite(s): CRMJS 1011 Introduction to Criminal Justice

Gangs and gang culture is a cutting edge course that explores what gang culture is like, how and why youth join gangs, how hard is it to exit gangs, how the gang culture affects youth and youth decision making, the most effective and least effective ways to combat the growth of gangs, and how communities have failed or been effective at halting gangs.
Prerequisite(s): CRMJS 1011 Introduction to Criminal Justice

White Collar Crime studies the varied and complex nature of white collar crimes and white collar criminals. The course examines the criminological explanations for white collar crime. The students will get the opportunity to talk with individuals who have committed white collar crimes. The course reviews the various kinds of white collar crime and the role of technology in white collar crimes.
Prerequisite(s): CRMJS 1011 Introduction to Criminal Justice

This course explores the explosion of cyber-crime and the challenges of policing cyber-crime. This course examines the profile of cyber-criminals and studies the criminology of cyber-crime.
Prerequisite(s): CRMJS 1011 Introduction to Criminal Justice

This course explores the international and national use of terrorism by various deviant groups. The course examines the profile and motivations of terrorists and terrorism. The course looks deeply into the ways law enforcement on the national and international level seeks to combat terrorism. The course examines specific terrorists acts to better understand the governmental body's strategies, and to determine if the governmental body was successful at suppressing future terrorist's acts.
Prerequisite(s): CRMJS 1011 Introduction to Criminal Justice

This course explores victim risk analysis and threat assessments from the victim's points of view and police's point of view. Victim risk analysis and threat assessment allow police and security officials to develop strategies and tactical plans. We will explore where the police and security officials have been effective and not effective in assessing risk.
Prerequisite(s): CRMJS 1011 Introduction to Criminal Justice

See department for course description.

An examination of contemporary problems in crime and delinquency with emphasis upon the theories of deviant behavior and correction. Cross listed with SOC 3150 Crime and Delinquency.
Prerequisite(s): CRMJS 1010 Introduction to Criminal Justice and SOC 1110 Introduction to Sociology or SOC 1120 Responding to Social Problems.
(Normally offered each spring semester.)

See department for course description.

This course explores the trend in modern police forces to go toward the Community Police model and the Problem-Oriented- Police model.  The course explores the changing dynamics of the police officers' duties and the changing dynamics of what it means to be an effective police officer.
Prerequisite(s): CRMJS 1011 Introduction to Criminal Justice

Advanced Criminal Law Case Analysis is an exciting and an in-depth study of criminal procedures and criminal law.  The students will gain a thorough knowledge of criminal procedures and an outstanding ability to analyze cases.  The students will be better trained in the law than most criminal justice professionals after taking this course.
Prerequisite(s): CRMJS 1011 Introduction to Criminal Justice

The purpose of this course is to provide an introduction to the research process in the social sciences and, in particular, in the study of criminal justice. This course will focus on the basic principles of quantitative and qualitative research. Basic concepts such as topic selection, research design, sampling, methodology selection, interpretation of data and application of research findings will be considered.
Prerequiste(s): CRMJS 1011 Introduction to Criminal Justice, SOC 1111 Introduction to Sociology, and MATH 1300 Statistics or BUSAD 2100 Business and Economic Statistics.

See department for course description.

See department for course description.
This course is offered in University College only.
 

The most exciting part of criminal justice is taking our learnings and applying our learnings to "real-world" experiences. We will provide an exciting opportunity to teach in the prison or an exciting opportunity to job shadow criminal justice professionals.
Prerequisite(s): CRMJS 1011 Introduction to Criminal Justice

See department for course description.

This course is the culmination of the student's academic experience. It serves to synthesize knowledge gained from the criminal justice curriculum as well as from other courses and life experience. It also serves to prepare students for entry-level positions in teh area of criminal justice or related fields, and to prepare them for continuing education at the graduate level.
Prerequisite(s): CRMJS 1011 Introduction to Criminal Justice, CRMJS 2131 Correction and Penology, CRMJS 2141 Juvenile Justice, CRMJS 2200 Introduction to Policing, CRMJS 2210 Probation and Parole CRMJS 2220 Ethical Issues in Criminal Justice, CRMJS 3111 Crime and Society, CRMJS 3151 Crime and Delinquency, CRMJS 3200 Community Policing, CRMJS 3210 Advanced Criminal Law Case AnalysisCRMJS 3300 Research Methods or permission of the instructor.

See department for course description.

This introductory course presents the basic processes of human interaction in everyday life while introducing students to the theories and methods governing social inquiry. The sociological perspective is used to study the impact of the forces of culture, socialization, social stratification, race, gender, and population on human thoughts and actions.
(Normally offered each semester.)

An anlysis of the characteristics and problems of racial and minority groups with special emphasis on the themes of prejudice and discrimination. This course focuses primarily on race relations and minority experiences in the United States.
(Normally offered each semester.)