Global Studies

Department/Program: Global Studies

Majors, Minors & Degrees:

This interdisciplinary major prepares students for careers in international business, law, journalism, international affairs, the Peace Corps, diplomatic service, international agencies, and government. Students are taught by faculty members with expertise in such varied places as the Caribbean, China, Egypt, France, Germany, Greece, India, Italy, Mexico, Russia, Spain, Sri Lanka, Thailand, and West Africa.

Students may specialize in Asia, Latin America, industrialized nations, foreign policy, and development studies; and they are required to spend at least one semester studying in another country.

As a second major, Global Studies adds broadened perspective and increased global awareness to any area of study.

The Global Studies major may be designated as either a Bachelor of Arts or a Bachelor of Science degree. If the Global Studies major is paired with a second major, the degree designation may be determined by the second major.

Courses

This course will prepare students who are considering going abroad for study, work, or volunteer/service learning by investigating the many facets of facing life in another culture. Topics to be covered include practical travel information, intercultural communication, cross-cultural value systems, foreign academic systems, and cultural self-awareness. This course will give students the tools to make their experience more successful and rewarding. The course is designed for both the student who has already applied for a program and for the student just beginning to explore the idea of going abroad.

Pass/Fail only.

This class is for students who have successfully completed a semester or year of study abroad and who would like to process that experience further by analyzing specific cultural and educational experiences and interacting with students who have had similar experiences abroad.

Pass/Fail only.

An introduction to the culture and contemporary society of Mexico with an overview of the country's history, political system, art, festivals and religious celebrations, and cuisine. Students will read a recent novel and view a contemporary film in order to catch the full "flavor" of the vitality and richness of Mexican culture.

An introduction to the culture and contemporary society of Spain with an overview of language and communication, religion, tradition and celebration, art and architecture, film, literature, and government. The course is designed to highlight the strong sense of identity that contemporary Spaniards feel at being part of the "New Spain" and members of the European Community.

This study abroad course will serve as an introduction to the culture and contemporary society of Spain with an overview of topics such as religion, tradition, literature, government/politics, cultural and religious celebrations, art, architecture, and history. The course is designed to highlight the strong sense of regional identity that contemporary Spaniards feel at being part of the "New Spain" as well as their attitudes toward being members of the European community. This course will be taught in English.

A course dealing with the literature, culture, and contributions of France to civilization, leading to an understanding of contemporary French culture and society. Included are surveys of art and architecture, the main periods of French history, French literature, and film. The course emphasizes the current state of French society.

An introduction to culture and daily life in contemporary Germany, providing an overview of language customs, social interaction, the arts, history, politics, the economy, and Germany's role in the European Union. Students should gain insight into how these factors affect the lives of Germans today.

By meeting at a place with a casual atmosphere, we attempt to recreate the Greek taverna or family restaurant, a place where Greeks go to eat and talk and dance and "be Greek." During our meetings, we too will eat and dance and (primarily) explore the history, art, literature, politics, and folk traditions of modern Greece.

By visiting urban and rural sites and surveying public discourse, students will be introduced to ancient and modern Greece in order to discover how and why Greeks preserve the religious, political, literary, and artistic elements of their culture's past.

This course deals with the culture of contemporary Russia, including a survey of its art, architecture and history. Special emphasis will be placed on the impact of the Stalinist years.

Thailand is the only country in southeast Asia that can boast of never having been colonized by a western nation. It is also a nation which distinguishes itself from all others by its three gems: Buddhism, the monarchy, and the Thai language. The course will introduce students to Thailand's vibrant and distinctive economic, political, and cultural traditions. By exploring Thailand's geography, history, political structure, religion, language, cultural traditions, ecological status, and populations, students may gain an understanding of how this ancient culture has been able to thrive in the modern era without sacrificing its national identity.

This course provides the opportunity to study the Indian culture from the perspective of social structure and contemporary society, politics, economics and the arts of contemporary India with an emphasis on the tensions created by rapid social and economic changes. The course will examine the role of religion, the caste system and how it is viewed by various social groups, the film industry, both Bollywood and Tollywood, and India's goals for itself in the global economy of the twenty-first century.

This course invites students to explore the complexities of the modern Japanese experience through the study of major literary texts and films. Students will learn key features of modern Japanese culture, know major authors and directors, and become familiar with critical methods of inquiry and analysis. No previous knowledge of Japanese culture or language is required.

This course will serve as an introduction to the culture and contemporary society of Japan, with an overview of topics such as cultural and religious traditions and celebrations, economics, art, architecture and history.

A topical course designed to investigate any relevant subject matter not included in any of the standard courses. The title, content, and credit will be determined by current, mutual interests of students and faculty. This course may be offered to meet a group requirement for a major only by approval of the department chair.

An opportunity for a student to engage in an individually arranged research project supervised by a Gender Studies faculty member. Special Projects may not duplicate courses described in the catalog.

Pass/Fail only.

Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor.

A topical course designed to investigate any relevant subject matter not included in any of the standard courses. The title, content, and credit will be determined by current, mutual interest of students and faculty. This course may be offered to meet a group of requirements for a major only by approval of the department chair.

An opportunity for a student to engage in an individually arranged research project supervised by a member of the Global Studies faculty. Independent Study may not duplicate courses described in the catalog.

Prerequisite(s): Permission of the Global Studies program director.

With the approval of the Global Studies chair, a student may elect an interdisciplinary thesis as a separate project under the directions of at least two faculty members, one of whom has expertise in the emphasis area.