English

Department/Program: English

Majors, Minors & Degrees:

Foreign language study is strongly encouraged for all English majors.

Credit earned in ENG 1010 English Language and Writing or ENG 1020 Composition, Language, and Literature does not count toward hour requirements for any English major or minor.

Each student graduating with a major in English will participate in a senior exit interview, normally in conjunction with ENG 4990 Senior Workshop. This review will provide a means of self-assessment for each student and program assessment for the department.

Courses

A course designed to help students write with clarity, confidence, and conviction through regular practice in writing (including argument and exposition, writing as discovery, and personal exploration). Particular attention will be given to the role of revision in the writing process. This course also includes a study of language and its social roles, with special attention to the origin, development, and current nature of the English language.

Students in this course will develop their skills in academic writing as they learn about topics drawn from the study of language, such as the history of language, language and gender, linguistic diversity and language policies in government and education. 
(Students with credit for AP Language and Composition will receive credit for ENG 1010 English Language and Writing)

This is a course in which students develop their composition skills through reading and writing about literature. The course includes a discussion of multiple genres and of literary works' historical and cultural contexts. Students will develop skills of writing in multiple forms and will learn the skills and terminology appropriate to discussion literary works in different genres. Students will receive instruction in writing skills such as structuring an argument, using evidence from multiple sources, using conventions appropriately, and refining an essay through revision.

Students in this course will develop their skill in academic writing as they respond to and analyze literature.

Student in this multi-genre writing course will develop their skill in both academic and creative writing as they explore what it means to be creative across multiple written mediums.

Students in this course will develop their skill in academic writing as they explore the relationship between academic discourse and the evolution of identity.

Students in this course will develop their skill in academic writing as they use writing to process the concepts in a particular academic discipline.

Students in this course will critically examine and analyze aspects of mass media and popular culture in order to explore how the media are used to construct meaning and/or to persuade.

Students in this course will explore how digital technology shapes composing practices through critical engagement with new media formats in order to produce multimedia works of their own.

Students in this course will develop their skill in academic and professional writing as they seek to understand, and use writing to act upon, complex social issues. Participants in IDS 107 will complete at least 20 hours of service learning. (With IDS 107, this course counts for Experiential Learning: Exploratory.)

Students in this course will study and practice the verbal representation of quantitative thought.

A topical course designed to investigate relevant subject matter not included in any standard courses. The title and the content will be determined by current mutual interests of students and faculty. This course may be offered to meet a requirement for a major only by approval of the department chair.

This is a research course. The student initially meets with the department chair to select a study topic and review research methods. At this time the student will be assigned a faculty resource person to guide his or her work and assist in an advisory capacity. A copy of the student's work is filed in the archives for the department. Independent study may not duplicate courses described in the catalog.
Prerequisite(s): Senior standing or permission of the department chair.

Supervised individual projects for students on topics selected by the student in consultation with the instructor. Special Projects may not duplicate courses described in the catalog.
Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor.

An on-the-job experience oriented toward the student’s major interest. The student is to secure a position in an organization that satisfies the mutual interests of the instructor, the sponsor, and the student.
Prerequisite(s): Permission of the department chair.

This course will introduce new English majors and minors to the critical methodologies, concepts, and terminology needed for the analysis and discussion of literature and other cultural texts and to the kinds of research and scholarship they will be asked to do in their later coursework. Students will also learn about a range of career paths open to those with a background in English.

An introductory course designed to help students appreciate the literary record of human relationships with nature, the supernatural, and each other. Each course examines a particular question or condition as it is represented in a restricted number of literary works, with core readings from the Bible, Greek or Roman classical literature, Shakespeare, literature by women, and literature by writers of color. Current offerings include the following.
Prerequisite(s): First Year Writing.
Encountering Others- This course looks at texts that represent moments of contact, conflict, or exchange between different cultures, or between a society and those individuals the society has designated as 'different' in some crucial way.
Coming of Age- Becoming Women, Becoming Men This course looks at texts that represent the forces and processes that are part of maturation, especially those related to gender identity. This course focuses on gender issues and includes feminist perspectives. Note: This course also counts for Gender Studies credit.
Families and Relationships- This course will examine how writers from different historical eras and cultural contexts write about family, in every sense of that word.
Writing the Self 'Who am I?'- This is the quintessential question that all human beings ask. This course examines how writers from different historical eras and cultural contexts use various narrative strategies to construct a sense of self. We will also examine numerous theories that seek to explain what constitutes the 'I' that locates the self as a palpable center of self-awareness, as well as how genre influences the accounting of personal history.
Sexualities- This course is designed to help students appreciate the literary record of romantic relationships. Specifically, the course will explore how writers from different historical periods and cultural milieus address the issue of human sexuality. Note: same-sex relationships will be routinely read about and discussed in the class. Note: This course also counts for Gender Studies credit.
Law and Justice- The courtroom is a place where one's telling and interpretation of stories can mean the difference between life and death, so the analysis of literature and the practice of the law are already intertwined. This course explores the connection further by focusing on literary works that deal with the principle of justice and the application of law.
Revolution- This course looks at texts that represent moments of sudden change, upheaval, and transformation, both within societies and within individuals.
Religion and Spirituality- Religion is a virtually universal constant in recorded human history, but with answers of different religions to humankind's big questions have varied enormously. What is the origin and purpose of evil? What is death? What things should be held sacred? What is the nature of the divine? How should we treat other people - and should we distinguish between those who share our beliefs and those who do not? This course will study some of the ways these questions have been answered, from most ancient times to the present.
The Environment- How are nature and the natural world imagined through literary texts? In the western tradition, "nature" is usually considered separate from humanity - a passive landscape designed to be dominated and used by humans for human purposes. What is the origin of this cultural attitude? What alternative views do we find in the history of western literature? What does the literary record of nature look like in some non-western cultural traditions? Is nature best understood as a universal category apart from human culture or is the idea of nature created by human culture? This course will explore such questions by reading texts from different eras and cultural traditions.
War- Virtually every culture has experienced war, and cultures often define and understand themselves through the memories of their wars. Literature about war, from western civilization's founding epic, Homer's Iliad, to blogs maintained by contemporary soldiers, provides us with not only some of our most memorable images of courage, loyalty, and self-sacrifice, but also compelling evidence of war's cruelty, horror, and senselessness; its themes encompass both enormous historical and cultural change and the most intimate, personal suffering.

A survey of British literature that provides a historical perspective to British writers and genres, from the middle ages to the present.
Prerequisite(s): First Year Writing.

A survey course providing a historical perspective on the culture of the United States through the study of its literature from its historical beginnings to the present.
Prerequisite(s): First Year Writing

An introduction to the writing of fiction with an emphasis upon a variety of forms, techniques, and narrative voices. Discussion of student writing will take place in a workship setting.
Prerequisite(s): First Year Writing or persmission of the instructor.

An introduction to the writing of poetry with an emphasis upon a variety of forms and techniques. Discussion of student writing will take place in a workshop setting.
Prerequisite(s): First Year Writing or permission of the instructor.

Each course in the Topics in World Literature group will study a selection of literary works that engage the chosen topic--texts of different genres, from historical eras, and from different cultural traditions. The selected readings will present both abstract principles involved in the topic and its immediate, lived realities.
Prerequisite(s): Any First Year Writing course.

Each course in the Topics in World Literature group will study a selection of literary works that engage the chosen topic--texts of different genres, from historical eras, and from different cultural traditions. The selected readings will present both abstract principles involved in the topic and its immediate, lived realities.
Prerequisite(s): Any First Year Writing course.

Each course in the Topics in World Literature group will study a selection of literary works that engage the chosen topic--texts of different genres, from historical eras, and from different cultural traditions. The selected readings will present both abstract principles involved in the topic and its immediate, lived realities.
Prerequisite(s): Any First Year Writing course.

Each course in the Topics in World Literature group will study a selection of literary works that engage the chosen topic--texts of different genres, from historical eras, and from different cultural traditions. The selected readings will present both abstract principles involved in the topic and its immediate, lived realities.
Prerequisite(s): Any First Year Writing course.

Each course in the Topics in World Literature group will study a selection of literary works that engage the chosen topic--texts of different genres, from historical eras, and from different cultural traditions. The selected readings will present both abstract principles involved in the topic and its immediate, lived realities.
Prerequisite(s): Any First Year Writing course.

Each course in the Topics in World Literature group will study a selection of literary works that engage the chosen topic--texts of different genres, from historical eras, and from different cultural traditions. The selected readings will present both abstract principles involved in the topic and its immediate, lived realities.
Prerequisite(s): Any First Year Writing course.

Each course in the Topics in World Literature group will study a selection of literary works that engage the chosen topic--texts of different genres, from historical eras, and from different cultural traditions. The selected readings will present both abstract principles involved in the topic and its immediate, lived realities.
Prerequisite(s): Any First Year Writing course.

Each course in the Topics in World Literature group will study a selection of literary works that engage the chosen topic--texts of different genres, from historical eras, and from different cultural traditions. The selected readings will present both abstract principles involved in the topic and its immediate, lived realities.
Prerequisite(s): Any First Year Writing course.

Each course in the Topics in World Literature group will study a selection of literary works that engage the chosen topic--texts of different genres, from historical eras, and from different cultural traditions. The selected readings will present both abstract principles involved in the topic and its immediate, lived realities.
Prerequisite(s): Any First Year Writing course.

This course will proceed from the premise that Herman Melville's 1851 novel, Moby Dick, encapsulates the story of America and that the book's whaling ship, the Pequod, serves as a floating embodiment of American democracy. The course will situate Melville's novel within the context of mid-nineteenth century American political history and explore what the book suggests are the achievements and limitations of American democracy.
Prerequisite(s): First Year Writing course.

Students study principles of liguistic analysis and survey various theories of English grammar. Topics include: English phonetics and phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and subfields of linguistics.
Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing or instructor permission.

An introductory course in the historical and grammatical development of Modern English from Old English and Middle English.
Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing or instructor permission.

Students will study the early history of rhetoric, drawing upon the Greek and Roman traditions and those of at least one additional culture. Students will focus on the major tenets of these rhetorical traditions, enabling them to analyze a variety of texts from multiple cultural perspectives.
Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing or instructor permission.

A survey study of instructional materials of special interest to the junior and senior high school age. Examination of various sources of print and nonprint materials.  Includes bibliotherapy, book-talk techniques, notable authors/producers, and prize winning materials. Discussion of censorship, controversial issues, selection criteria, and the tools to keep abreast of the field.
Cross-listed with EDUC 2690 Young Adult Literature.

A topical course designed to investigate any relevant subject matter not included in any of the standard courses. The title, content, and credit will be determined by current, mutual interests of students and faculty. This course will usually be a course in literature, but it may sometimes be a course in language or writing.

This is a research course. The student initially meets with the department chair to select a study topic and review research methods. At this time the student will be assigned a faculty resource person to guide his or her work and assist in an advisory capacity. A copy of the student's work is filed in the archives for the department. Independent study may not duplicate courses described in the catalog.
Prerequisite(s): Senior standing or permission of the department chair.

Supervised individual projects for students on topics selected by the student in consultation with the instructor. Special Projects may not duplicate courses described in the catalog.
Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor.

An on-the-job experience oriented toward the student’s major interest. The student is to secure a position in an organization that satisfies the mutual interests of the instructor, the sponsor, and the student.
Prerequisite(s): Permission of the department chair.

A systematic study of the oustanding literary artist of the English language: comedies, tragedies, and historical plays.
Prerequisite(s): First Year Writing, ENG 2000 Introduction to Textual Studies or THTRE 1020 Script Analysis and Junior standing.

The focus of this course is on the writing process and its product, as applied to a particular genre (risk fiction, scriptwriting, creative nonfiction, the essay, biography), which will vary from semester to semester. The course is conducted as a workshop in which students read their own compositions to the class and respond to the compositions of their classmates. Students may request Chair approval to repeat this course for credit with a different genre.
Prerequisite(s): First Year Writing.

An advanced writing workshop covering rhetorical principles (invention, arrangement, style, presentation) of various disciplines. Students will complete writing projects related to their professional and civic interests.
Prerequisite(s): Junior standing.

An advanced course in the writing of fiction within a continued emphasis on a variety of forms, techniques, and narrative voices. Discussion of student writing will take place in a workshop setting. Specific topics will vary by semester. Course may be repeated for credit with the permission of the instructor.
Prerequisite(s): ENG 2170 Introduction to Fiction Writing or permission of the instructor.

An advanced course in the writing of poetry with a continued emphasis on a variety of forms and techniques. Discussion of student writing will take place in a workshop setting. Specific topics will vary by semester. Course may be repeated for credit with the permission of the instructor.
Prerequisite(s): ENG 2190 Introduction to Poetry Writing or permission of the instructor.

A course in the literature of the medieval period in England, emphasizing the period's linguistic diversity and focusing on texts featuring situations or characters that in some way transcend ordinary experience.
Prerequisite(s): ENG 2000 Introduction to Textual Studies and junior standing.

A course on the work of the poet Geoffrey Chaucer, his London dialect of Middle English, the different genres and subject matter of his major poetry, and that poetry's cultural and literary context. This course is designed in two linked but freestanding two-credit, eight-week courses.
Prerequisite(s): ENG 2000 Introduction to Textual Studies and junior standing

This course will study the 19th century Boston- based movement known as American Transcendentalism, a movement that was equal parts literary, philosophical, religious, and reformist. Writers studied will usually include Emerson, Fuller, Hawthorne, Thoreau, Whitman, Melville, and Dickinson.
Prerequisite(s): First Year Writing and junior standing or permission of the instructor.

A course devoted to literary modernism in English-- the revolutions in poetry and fiction undertaken on both sides of the Atlantic after World War I. William Butler Yeats, Jeams Joyce, and Virginia Woolf will be among the writers studied in the first course, Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald, and William Faulkner among those studied in the second. This course is designed in two linked but free-standing two-credit, eight-week courses.
Prerequisite(s): ENG 2000 Introduction to Textual Studies and junior standing or permission of the instructor.

This course will examine the influential artistic and philosophical movement known as postmodernism. Although the main focus will be on literary postmodernism, students will be encouraged to explore the application of postmodern theory to consumer culture, architecture, film, music, and other fields.
Prerequisite(s): First Year Writing and Junior standing or permission of the instructor.

In this course, students will read a selection of plays by ancient Greek playrights: the comedies of Aristophanes and the tragedies of Aeschylus, Euripides, and Sophocles. For a semester project, students will work as a collaborative team to write and perform a dramatic work (along with related documents) to demonstrate their understanding of the genre, period, and culture.
Prerequisite(s): First Year Writing and Junior Standing.

A course devoted to literary modernism in English -- the revolutions in poetry and fiction undertaken on both sides of the Atlantic after World War I. William Butler Yeats, Jeams Joyce, and Virginia Woolf will be among the writers studied in the first course, Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald, and William Faulkner are among those studied in the second. This course is designed in two linked but freestanding two-credit, eight-week courses.
Prerequisite(s): ENG 2000 Introduction to Textual Studies and junior standing or permission of the instructor.

ASince its publication in 1831, Alexis de Tocqueville's Democracy in America has remained a classic text in sociology, political science, and American cultural studies, both as a document of what the United States was like in the half-century before the Civil War and as a dissection of our national character. The course will be devoted to reading, discussing, analyzing, and writing about Tocqueville's influential study.
Prerequisite(s): POLSC 1000 United States Government and Politics and junior standing or permission of the instructor.

A course in the historical and political contexts of modern Irish literature, including the work of William Butler Yeats, James Joyce, Seamus Heaney, and others.
Prerequisite(s): Interdisciplinary Studies 1200 or ENG 2000 Introduction to Textual Studies or junior standing or permission of the instructor.

This course in the development of the novel since the end of World War II, uses examples drawn primarily from Great Britain, the United States, and the Anglophone world.
Prerequisite(s): ENG 2000 Introduction to Textual Studies and junior standing.

An introduction to the contemporary Chicano novel, generally including (but not limited to) the work of Sandra Cisneros, Rudolfo Anaya, Helena Maria Viramontes, Ana Castillo, and Dagoberto Gib.
Prerequisite(s): First Year Writing and junior standing or permission of the instructor.

Fiction and essays by women from various cultures (including the U.S., Europe, Africa, Latin America, and the Caribbean) will be the focus of this course. The multicultural, international reading list will provide students insight into the lives and experiences of women most likely very different from themselves; thus they can appreciate and learn from the differences and make connections across cultures.
Prerequisite(s): First Year Writing and sophomore standing.
Cros-listed with GEND 3410 Women Writing Across Cultures
 

A thematic course designed to complement the more traditional offerings in British and American literature. The emphasis will be on the shock of colonization, the oppression of imperialism, and the struggle for independence. Attention will also be paid to the encounter of the individual with the questions of God, family, love, war, work, change, and death.
Prerequisite(s): First Year Writing and Sophomore standing.

A course in which students will concentrate in depth on one subfield or topic in the domain of linguistics. The particular subject will be determined each time the course is offered.
Prerequisite(s): Junior standing or instructor permission.
(Normally offered every other year.)

A course in which students will concentrate in depth on one topic within the domain of rhetoric. The particular subject will be determined each time the course is offered.
Prerequisite(s): Junior standing or instructor permission.
(Normally offered every other year.)

This course supplements the basic American survey courses. Its aim is to acquaint students with representative autobiography, fiction, drama, poetry, literary criticism, and essays by African-American writers from Frederick Douglass to Toni Morrison.
Prerequisite(s): First Year Writing and Sophomore standing.

An advanced course designed to investigate any relevant subject matter not included in any of standard courses. The title, content, and credit will be determined by current, mutual interests of students and faculty. This course will usually be a course in literature, but it may sometimes be a course in language or writing. This course may be offered to meet a group requirement for a major only by approval of the department chair.
Prerequisite(s): Junior standing or instructor approval.

An opportunity for students, under the supervision of a faculty member, to pursue literature not covered in other coursework.

A course in pedagogical theory as it relates to teaching composition and introductory literature classes. This course is the required preparation for ENG 3930 Pedagogy Practicum (English Student Instructor) (First Year Writing or ENG 2010 Masterpieces of Literature Student Instructor).
Pass/Fail only.
Prerequisite(s): Approval of instructor and department chair, ENG 2000 Introduction to Textual Studies, ENG 2010 Masterpieces of Literature, and junior standing.
(Only offered winter term.)

Student instructors will apply their knowledge of discipline-specific pedagogical theories by working with faculty members in either First Year Writing or ENG 2010 Masterpieces of Literature. Students will plan class discussions; create and respond to student assignments; and do independent projects designed to reflect on their experiences in class. All students in ENG 3930 Pedagogy Practicum (English Student Instructor) will meet once a month with the department chair to evaluate their progress. Course may not be repeated for credit.
Pass/Fail only.
Prerequisite(s): Aprroval of instructor and department chair and ENG 3920 Preparation for Pedagogy Practicum.

This is a research course. The student initially meets with the department chair to select a study topic and review research methods. At this time the student will be assigned a faculty resource person to guide his or her work and assist in an advisory capacity. A copy of the student's work is filed in the archives for the department. Independent study may not duplicate courses described in the catalog.
Prerequisite(s): Senior standing or permission of the department chair.

A projects course designed to analyze and develop techniqes and subjects not involved in any of the standard courses. The topic, content, and credit will be determined by current, mutual interests of students and faculty. This course may be counted toward a major empahsis area with the approval of the department chair.

A project course in which students serve as apprentices in their chosen fields.  Students' progress and performance will be supervised and evaluated jointly by the cooperating supervisor and instructor.  Each project will be individually designed to suit the student's professional interests. 
Pass/Fail only.
Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor.

A topical course designed to investigate relevant courses. The title and the content will be determined by current mutual interests of students and faculty. This course may be offered to meet a requirement for a major only by approval of the department chair.

An opportunity for students, under the supervision of a faculty member, to pursue scientific literature not covered in other coursework.

This is a research course. The student initially meets with the department chair to select a study topic and review research methods. At this time the student will be assigned a faculty resource person to guide his or her work and assist in an advisory capacity. A copy of the student's work is filed in the archives for the department. Independent study may not duplicate courses described in the catalog.
Prerequisite(s): Senior standing or permission of the department chair.

Supervised individual projects for students on topics selected by the student in consultation with the instructor. Special Projects may not duplicate courses described in the catalog.
Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor.

An on-the-job experience oriented toward the student’s major interest. The student is to secure a position in an organization that satisfies the mutual interests of the instructor, the sponsor, and the student.
Prerequisite(s): Permission of the department chair.

A course in the theory and development of literary criticism including a general overview of theories of literary criticism before the 20th-century and 20th-century critical theories.
Prerequisite(s): Senior standing.

A senior-level research and writing seminar. In this course students produce a research paper of approximately 20 pages or an original work (e.g., a short story) supplemented with a 10-page essay that explains their work critically. At the end of the term, students make panel presentations about their work to the entire department, and each paper is read by two faculty chosen by each student.
Prerequisite(s): Senior standing.

A topical course designed to investigate relevant subject matter not included in any standard courses. The title and the content will be determined by current mutual interests of students and faculty. This course may be offered to meet a requirement for a major only by approval of the department chair.

This is a research course. The student initially meets with the department chair to select a study topic and review research methods. At this time the student will be assigned a faculty resource person to guide his or her work and assist in an advisory capacity. A copy of the student's work is filed in the archives for the department. Independent study may not duplicate courses described in the catalog.
Prerequisite(s): Senior standing or permission of the department chair.

Supervised individual projects for students on topics selected by the student in consultation with the instructor. Special Projects may not duplicate courses described in the catalog.
Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor.

An on-the-job experience oriented toward the student’s major interest. The student is to secure a position in an organization that satisfies the mutual interests of the instructor, the sponsor, and the student.
Prerequisite(s): Permission of the department chair.

An introductory course in journalism concentrating upon basic techniques of news gathering and writing, including a basic history of news media.

Analysis of and practice in writing news feature stories for a variety of publications. The course will stress audience appraisal, interviewing, and research.

Study and practice of various print-media production skills including typography, layout design, and printing techniques. Students will learn several pagination and design computer programs.

Working session during which staff members produce the weekly newspaper, The Reveille. May be repeated. Credit is limited to 4 hours.
Pass/Fail only.

A topical course designed to investigate any relevant subject matter not included in any of the standard advanced-level courses. The title, content, and credit will be determined by the faculty member who is offering the course. This course may be offered to meet a requirement for a major only by approval of the department chair.

This is a research course. The student initially meets with the department chair to select a study topic and review research methods. At this time the student will be assigned a faculty resource person to guide his or her work and assist in an advisory capacity. A copy of the student's work is filed in the archives for the department. Independent study may not duplicate courses described in the catalog.
Prerequisite(s): Senior standing or permission of the department chair.

Supervised individual projects for students on topics selected by the student in consultation with the instructor. Special Projects may not duplicate courses described in the catalog.
Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor.

An on-the-job experience oriented toward the student’s major interest. The student is to secure a position in an organization that satisfies the mutual interests of the instructor, the sponsor, and the student.
Prerequisite(s): Permission of the department chair.

Advanced study and practice of computer-related print production skills.
Prerequisite(s): JOURN 2640 Design for Print Media or permission of the instructor.

A topical course designed to investigate relevant subject matter not included in any standard courses. The title and the content will be determined by current mutual interests of students and faculty. This course may be offered to meet a requirement for a major only by approval of the department chair.

This is a research course. The student initially meets with the department chair to select a study topic and review research methods. At this time the student will be assigned a faculty resource person to guide his or her work and assist in an advisory capacity. A copy of the student's work is filed in the archives for the department. Independent study may not duplicate courses described in the catalog.
Prerequisite(s): Senior standing or permission of the department chair.

A projects course designed to analyze and develop techniques and subjects not involved in any of the standard coruses. The topic, content, and credit will be determined by current, mutual interests of students and faculty.

On-the-job training with a newspaper or other sponsor involved with communications. Work may include writing, photography, or production. Each internship will be designed individually to benefit both student and sponsor. Sponsors may be secured either by the student or by the department.
Pass/Fail only.
Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor.

A topical course designed to investigate relevant subject matter not included in any standard courses. The title and the content will be determined by current mutual interests of students and faculty. This course may be offered to meet a requirement for a major only by approval of the department chair.

An opportunity for students, under the supervision of a faculty member, to pursue scientific literature not covered in other coursework.

This is a research course. The student initially meets with the department chair to select a study topic and review research methods. At this time the student will be assigned a faculty resource person to guide his or her work and assist in an advisory capacity. A copy of the student's work is filed in the archives for the department. Independent study may not duplicate courses described in the catalog.
Prerequisite(s): Senior standing or permission of the department chair.

Supervised individual projects for students on topics selected by the student in consultation with the instructor. Special Projects may not duplicate courses described in the catalog.
Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor.

An on-the-job experience oriented toward the student’s major interest. The student is to secure a position in an organization that satisfies the mutual interests of the instructor, the sponsor, and the student.
Prerequisite(s): Permission of the department chair.