Social Work

Department/Program: Social Work

For the Bachelor of Science degree in Social Work, students are required to complete all courses listed for the major. Students desiring the Bachelor of Arts degree in social work will need to complete a minimum of 15 hours of a modern foreign language (Spanish is highly recommended) in addition to the required courses. 

Provisional admission to the social work program may be made by contacting the program director. Provisional admission requires a minimum grade point average of 2.33 overall and completion of a provisional admission application.

Declaration of social work major and provisional admission to the program does not guarantee acceptance into Full Admission status. Only those accepted for Full Admission status may continue on in the program. Full Admission status requires a grade of “C+” or better in entry-level social work courses and completion of a Full Admission application and interview before the Social Work Executive Council. Full Admission interviews are conducted in November and April of each year.

A Pre-Field Placement Consultation is required before students may enroll in SOCWK 297 Field Practicum. SOCWK 210 Micro Practice: Individuals and Families and SOCWK 208 Group Practice or SOCWK 209 Macro Practice: Community Organization, Planning and Administration must be completed with grades of “B-” or better. Students must also have a minimum 2.67 overall grade point average. Finally, students must have completed a minimum of 60 approved volunteer/ shadowing hours prior to the consultation. The Consultation will take place with the Program and Field Directors.

All social practice courses (SOCWK 208 Group Practice, SOCWK 209 Macro Practice: Community Organization, Planning and Administration, SOCWK 210 Micro Practice: Individuals and Families, SOCWK 265 Research Informed Practice, SOCWK 297 Field Practicum) must be completed with a grade of "B-" or better to successfully complete the program. All other 200-level social work courses must be completed with a grade of "C+" or better.

The social work program at Nebraska Wesleyan University complies with the standards of and is fully accredited by the Council on Social Work Education (C.S.W.E.).

Council on Social Work Education
1725 Duke Street, Suite 500
Alexandria, VA 22314-3457
info@cswe.org
www.cswe.org

Courses

Survey of the field of professional social work, including the roles, philosophy, values, skills, and knowledge base needed. Areas of practice and career expectations are explained.

(Normally offered each fall semester.)

This course studies the historical development of social welfare policies, services, and institutions and addresses contemporary policy and service delivery. The social, political, and value systems that create policies are studied. A systems perspective focuses on the relationship between policy, services, and institutions at the local, state, and federal levels. International perspectives on social policy are discussed for comparative purposes. Primary areas of focus are public welfare, aging, and mental health. Policy implementation and change are discussed.

(Normally offered each spring semester.)

A course to synthesize and examine the body of knowledge concerning how the individual, group, family, and community systems interrelate with each other and the larger social context from the lifespan stages of birth through adolescence. Content will be drawn from the biological, psychological, sociological, eco-political, and cultural-environmental systems. The importance of professional ethics in the assessment process is also examined.

(Normally offered each fall semester.)

A course to synthesize and examine the body of knowledge concerning how the individual, group, family, and community systems interrelate with each other and the larger social context from the lifespan stages of early adulthood through aging and death. Content will be drawn from the biological, psychological, sociological, eco-political, and cultural-environmental systems. The importance of professional ethics in the assessment process is also examined.

(Normally offered each spring semester.)

This course will expose students to the various types of violence experienced by individuals and families across their lifespan. An introduction to various theories used in working with survivors of abuse will be presented and students will learn about bruises and fractures associated with child abuse. The influence of societal "isms", culture, gender, and sexual orientation related to violence will be incorporated into the material being discussed.

(Normally offered each spring semester.)

A course designed to treat subject matter not covered in other departmental courses or to provide study of subject matter introduced in other courses. The title, content, and credit hours will be determined by current mutual interests of faculty and students.

This course provides an understanding of the theoretical underpinnings as well as the practical applications of group work as a vehicle for social work. It also explores how and why groups function and develop skills and techniques of membership and leadership.

Prerequisite(s): SOCWK 015 Introduction to Social Work or permission of the social work program director.

(Normally offered each spring semester.)

An introductory course to the administration and planning of social service organizations. Major emphasis upon community, organization, and legislative analysis; management skills; program planning; and evaluation. A practice-oriented course including simulations, in-class projects, volunteer experience, and personal introspection.

Prerequisite(s): SOCWK 015 Introduction to Social Work and SOCWK 120 Social Welfare Policy, Services, and Delivery Systems or permission of the social work program director.

(Normally offered each spring semester.)

Emphasis on social work theory and practice skills. Study of communication patterns, empathic response and assessment of client situations. Experiential learning through role playing, observation, and discussion.

Prerequisite(s): SOCWK 015 Introduction to Social Work or permission of the social work program director.

(Normally offered each fall semester.)

This course is designed to introduce students to the fundamentals of strengths perspective theory, assessment, and intervention with individuals, families, and communities. Students are also introduced to concepts from related solution-oriented intervention approaches. Strategies and techniques for structuring the helping process in a way that maximizes client self-determination and the probability of successful goal attainments will be emphasized.

Prerequisite(s): SOCWK 015 Introduction to Social Work and junior standing or permission of the social work program director.

(Normally offered alternate years.)

The course surveys the field of social work in the health care arena. A generalist social work perspective will be used to address the social work roles of assessment, intervention, advocacy, and policy analysis in the health care environment. Social work roles at the individual, group, and organizational/community levels will be addressed.

Prerequisite(s): SOCWK 015 Introduction to Social Work and junior standing or permission of the social work program director.

(Normally offered alternate years.)

An introduction and overview of research methods used in generalist social work practice. Course content includes both quantitative and qualitative methods and emphasizes critiquing research, program evaluation, methods of data collection and analysis, single-subject design, ethical considerations, and the application of evidence-based practice to improve policy and social service delivery.

Prerequisite(s): SOCWK 015 Introduction to Social Work; SOC 110 Social Statistics or PSYCH 110 Psychological Statistics or ECON 110 Business and Economic Statistics or BUSAD 110 Business and Economic Statistics or BUS 106 Statistics for Business; and junior standing.

(Normally offered each semester.)

A topical course designed to investigate relevant subject matter not included in any of the standard courses. The title and content will be determined by current mutual interests of students and faculty. This course may be offered to meet a requirement for a major only by approval of the department chair.

Intensive readings in the discipline.

An opportunity for students to learn from direct experience and personal interaction guided by lectures in the field and selected readings. Students will be guided to formulate and carry out specific research and/or establish constructive relationships with the subjects.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 003 Introduction to Sociology and ANTHR 151 Cultural Anthropology or approval of the instructor.

Supervised individual projects in conjunction with departmental research, community services and student interest. Special Projects may not duplicate courses described in the catalog.

Prerequisite(s): Approval of the social work program director.

Supervised learning experiences in selected social work agencies. The experience introduces a variety of social work practice roles and enables the student to apply social work knowledge, skills, and values in a real practice situation. May be taken as block placement for 9 credit hours or as a concurrent placement over two semesters for a total of 9 credit hours.

Prerequisite(s): SOCWK 210 Micro Practice: Individuals and Families and SOCWK 208 Group Practice or SOCWK 209 Macro Practice: Community Organization, Planning and Administration, with grades of "B-" or better, and approved Pre-Field Placement Consultation.

Independent field research required for all majors.

Prerequisite(s): SOCWK 265 Research Informed Practice and approval of the instructor.